Low Fat and Reduced Fat

Friday, September 30, 2011

Question: Does low fat mean the same thing as reduced fat?

Answer: No. Food labels can be confusing but the claims have specific meanings. Low fat means a product contains 3g of fat or less per serving, and 30% or less of total calories.

Reduced fat, on the other hand, refers to a product's claim to contain at least 25% less fat than the original version. This does not mean that the reduced fat version is low fat. Take a package of reduced fat muffins, for example. If the original fat content per muffin was 20g, and the fat has been reduced to 15g, it is still five times higher than the 3g per serving that officially qualifies as low fat.


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New York Style Bagels

Friday, September 30, 2011
Making bagels seemed a daunting task, yet one I'd been meaning to do for a long time. My girls eat bagels most days, and we always have some in the house. I miss the days when we lived on the Upper West Side of New York and lined up for fresh, hot bagels. Packaged supermarket bagels just aren't the same; they're too soft and bread-like. So I set out to come up with a straightforward recipe that would produce a similar texture to the bagels we used to enjoy in New York. It turns out that the key to the chewy texture lies more in the handling of the dough and the adoption of one critical step before baking the bagels. So set aside half a morning and try your hand at making some wonderfully chewy, dense, low-fat New York style bagels.

New York Style Bagels Photo c 2011 Fiona Haynes, licensed to About.com


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Top Five Soup Meals

Friday, September 30, 2011

You may be used to eating soup as an appetizer or starter course of sorts. But when the chill of fall is in the air, or the long wintry nights are dragging by, there is nothing more comforting or satisfying than a hearty soup supper. Combinations of meats, fish, vegetables, beans, or pasta make for the ultimate one-dish meal, and these five recipes will make a low calorie soup supper easy to plan.

1. Vegetarian Chili

Photo @ Kimberley K. Eggleston

Chili is a wonderful make-ahead meal. As long as you are cooking, double the recipe to this hearty vegetarian chili, and store half in the freezer for a quick meal a few weeks down the road. Before serving, pile on the usual chili toppings such as low-fat shredded cheese, sour cream, or green onion if desired.

2. Hearty Minestrone

Photo @ Kimberley K. Eggleston

This soup is a staple around my house. It is especially delicious in early fall when there is a nip in the air, and fresh zucchini is easy to come by. You need only a small amount of the flavorful Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese to finish off the soup. Served with crusty bread, this is a completely satisfying meal.

3. Classic Chicken and Rice Soup

Photo @ Kimberley K. Eggleston

This makes delicious bowls of warm comfort, just like grandma used to make. The recipe is quite traditional with just one small twist. The rosemary, which adds a delicate touch to this classic recipe, will keep you coming back for more. Serve with warm whole wheat rolls and saltine crackers.

4. Taco Soup

Photo @ Kimberley K. Eggleston

Ready for a little spice? This soup is a fulfilling taco in a bowl, complete with tomatoes, beans, beef, and onions. Accompany with a slice of corn bread for dipping. For a perfect finish, top it off with a dollop of fat-free sour cream or non-fat plan yogurt.

5. New England Clam Chowder

Photo @ Kimberley K. Eggleston

Most clam chowders lend their flavor to high fat cream and bacon drippings. This recipe uses only a small amount of bacon and flavorful clam juice resulting in a full-flavored creamy low calorie clam chowder. Sprinkle with oyster crackers and accompany with a slice of crusty bread and small green salad for a complete meal.


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Crock-Pot Beef Stew

Friday, September 30, 2011

Beef Stew

I like to make this crock-pot beef stew as I can throw it together early in the day, and then not have to worry about it until we are ready to eat. It makes a wonderful, comforting fall meal.

Photo@ Kimberley K. Eggleston, licensed to About.com, Inc


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If "Low-Carb Diet" was a Pill

Friday, September 30, 2011
pills In the past few months, I've heard a few people say words to the effect that if the benefits of a low-carb diet were packed into a pill, it would be the biggest money-maker of all time. Think of it: not only would it cause weight loss, but it would lower triglycerides, blood glucose, and blood pressure (assuming they are high). It would raise HDL ("good") cholesterol, and it would move LDL cholesterol particle size away from the dangerous "pattern B", to the larger, safer particle type "pattern A". This would substantially reduce the risk for both heart disease and diabetes. (The list of things low-carb diets helps is very similar to the list of symptoms for metabolic syndrome, which is a major risk factor for both of these conditions.)

Why would people so much rather take a pill than make a healthy change in their diets? Well, obviously, it would be easier. We are so surrounded by foods full of sugar and other refined carbs that not only are people very accustomed to them, but it's often difficult to find anything else to eat. These foods are also very well-marketed in campaigns backed by huge amounts of money. Broccoli, salmon, berries, flax seeds...not so much. If there was a pill that would allow people to eat sugar all day long and still be healthy, the large food companies and the drug companies would both be thrilled.

If only that large marketing effort could be directed to the type of eating that causes all those great changes. But probably not many people can get rich from recommending healthy whole foods and avoiding starches and sugars.

Photo c Paul Eekhoff

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Low-Carb Honey Cake for Rosh Hashanah

Friday, September 30, 2011
starDoes a a low-carb honey cake sound like a contradiction in terms? I've made this yummy low-carb and gluten-free cake with just a little dark honey for Rosh Hashanah - but it's just as good without it, as a nice, autumnal spice cake. So try my Honey Cake or other Low Carb Desserts. For other Rosh Hashanah menu ideas, try these from Giora Shimoni, About.com's Guide to Kosher Food. And Happy New Year if you celebrate!

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20 Benefits of LC Diets

Thursday, September 29, 2011
There are a lot of potential benefits to reduced-carbohydrate diets. Some of them have been intensely studied, while others have been commonly reported among people who have reduced the carbohydrate in their diets. Not everyone will gain all these benefits, of course. People who are more sensitive to carbohydrates are probably more likely to receive more benefit.

Scientifically Demonstrated

Although I have linked to only one study for each of these claims, there are many studies, often going back decades, that show similar results. This is why I feel safe in saying these results have been demonstrated. However, note that in many of these studies, people were not screened for factors such as insulin resistance. If the group most likely to benefit is studied, rather than a random sample, the results could be stronger.

Commonly Reported

These are some of the most commonly reported benefits in low carb forums, support groups, and informal surveys. (Some have preliminary scientific evidence, but more subjective improvements are harder to study.) The first two are by far the most commonly reported, and these benefits usually happen by the end of the first week, although sometimes it takes another week or two. Results are obviously going to be variable between individuals.
  • Increased energy
  • Cravings for sweets gone or much less
  • Better mental concentration; no “brain fog”
  • Improved mood; emotions more even
  • ”Compulsive” or “emotional” eating gone
  • Improved dental hygiene (less dental plaque; improved gum health)

Sometimes Reported

These are more variable, partly dependent upon the symptoms the person was having in the first place. Again, a low carb diet can in no way be considered a cure for these conditions, and this is not a scientific survey. Also, rest assured I am not listing every benefit I have ever heard of - these have been mentioned enough to make me think that there is validity to them for some people.
  • Improvement in joint or muscle pain
  • Fewer headaches
  • PMS improved
  • Gastrointestinal symptoms, such as heartburn, improved
  • Improvement in skin appearance

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Congratulations, Jimmy Moore!

Thursday, September 29, 2011
jimmyOne of the leading lights of the low-carb community, with his Livin' La Vida Low-Carb Blog and podcast, books, and more, is the hard-working Jimmy Moore. No one is more dedicated than he is to bringing the news about low-carb eating. Not only does he interview all the experts in nutrition, fitness, and especially low-carb and paleo eating, but he shares his own journey with us, including his tweaks along the way (the latest is that he and his wife have "gone paleo", but I suspect he wasn't all that far away from it).

Recently, Jimmy passed a huge milestone - his 500TH podcast episode, which is sort of mind-boggling. That episode is basically an Ode to all the good Jimmy has done in the world, and I'd like to share in those thoughts. Jimmy has made an enormous contribution to the health of countless people, and we all owe him a debt of gratitude. Jimmy, my thanks and very best wishes to you and Christine, and I hope to share many more memories and opportunities to work together in the future. I'm glad we're on the same side in fighting the good fight!

Photo c Jimmy Moore

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The Joy of Cooking vs. Junk Food

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Conventional wisdom tells us that the reason so many Americans are overweight, especially those with lower incomes, is their reliance on cheap junk food. After all, a candy bar or a bag of chips is cheaper than a bunch of carrots or a pound of apples.

Nonsense, says food writer Mark Bittman. He argues in the New York Times that feeding a family of four at McDonald's typically costs between $23 and $28, whereas a home-cooked dinner of roast chicken, vegetables, mashed potatoes, plus a basic salad and milk costs around $14. Even the calorie argument doesn't wash. Fast food is a good source of cheap calories, it is argued, but so too is home-cooked food.

Then there's the argument that lower-income families have limited access to supermarkets. Bittman counters by saying that most still have access to vehicles and if they are able to drive to McDonald's, they are surely able to drive to the nearest Safeway.

We eat junk food because cooking is perceived by many as work. After a long day it's too much hassle, especially if you're essentially a short-order cook catering to every family member's preferences. Then there's the more insidious argument that hyper-processed food contains just the right combination of ingredients of salt, fat and sugar that makes it virtually addictive. If cooking is work, junk food is both quick and pleasurable.

So what's the answer? Bittman says a cultural shift is needed. We need to be educated about the joy of cooking. The hard thing for many, though, will still be fitting one more thing in to already busy schedules.

What do you think?


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Baked Apples

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Top this this simple fall or winter dessert with a scoop of low fat frozen vanilla yogurt or enjoy as is.

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Total Time: 40 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup dried cranberries or raisins
  • 1/4 cup chopped walnuts
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 4 Granny Smith apples

Preparation:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

In a small bowl, combine dried fruit, walnuts, sugar and cinnamon. Core each apple and place in a baking dish. Spoon one-fourth of the ingredients into each apple. Bake for 40 minutes or until apples are tender.

Serves 4

Per Serving: Calories 287, Calories from Fat 50, Total Fat 5.5g (sat 0.5g), Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium 6mg, Carbohydrate 57.5g, Fiber 6.8g, Protein 1.7g


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Healthy Apple Pie

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Limiting the sugar helps to make this apple pie a little healthier. We prefer this healthy apple pie warm, with a scoop of low-fat frozen yogurt or ice cream.

Prep Time: 45 minutes

Cook Time: 50 minutes

Total Time: 95 minutes

Ingredients:

  • Crust:
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/4 cup chilled butter
  • 3 Tbsp ice water
  • Filling:
  • 2 cups peeled, cored and sliced granny smith apples
  • 2 cups peeled, cored, and sliced gala apples
  • 1 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 2 Tbsp granulated sugar
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp flour
  • 2 Tbsp butter

Preparation:

1. In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour and salt. Cut in the chilled butter, using two knives or a pastry blender. Sprinkle the ice water, 1 tablespoon at a time into the mixture, mixing with a fork after each addition. Using your hands, form the dough into a ball. Roll the dough into an 11-inch circle between two sheet of plastic wrap coated with cooking spray. Place the dough in the refrigerator for 30 minutes.

2. Preheat the oven to 425°F.

3.Remove the top sheet of plastic wrap from the pie dough. Turn the dough over into a 9-inch pie plate coated with cooking spray, and remove the remaining layer of plastic wrap. Press the dough into the pie plate, and flute the edges, using your fingers.

4.Toss the apples together with the lemon juice in a large bowl. In a seperate bowl, combine the remaining sugars and flour. Combine this sugar mixture with the apples, and then pour the apples into the pie crust. Use a knife to cut the remaining butter into small pieces, and distribute the butter pieces over the top of the pie.

5. Bake at 425°F for 10 minutes, then turn the heat down to 350°F and bake an additional 30 minutes.

Serves 10

Per Serving Calories 182


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Low Carb and Your Heart

Thursday, September 29, 2011

"But what about the long term?"

It seems that every study of low-carbohydrate diets, which almost always show positive results, ends with words of warning that a low-carb diet cannot be recommended for the long term because of lack of data. The problem, of course, is that it takes a long time to get long-term data! So, those of us who have experienced positive effects from reducing carbohydrates just have to wait for the people in white coats to crunch those numbers. Well, wait no longer! In November of 2006 a report of a very long-term study was published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The Study

The data were drawn from a large study of over 120,000 female nurses which has been going on since 1976. Six years ago, this same group of researchers analyzed the carbohydrate intake over a 10 year period of the study, and found that glycemic load was the biggest factor in determining the effect of carbohydrate on health, rather than the composition of the carbohydrate (simple vs complex). In that previous study, it was found that people eating the diet with the highest glycemic load had almost twice the incidence of heart disease as those eating the lowest glycemic load. The evidence from this new study confirms and builds upon what was found earlier, drawing from data from an 18 year period following 82,802 women.

This time, the researchers aimed to find answers to some new questions. One of the worries about low-carb diets has to do with eating more protein and fat in the longer term, especially if that protein and fat comes from animal sources, which are usually higher in saturated fat. In the short run, research seems to indicate that the markers for heart disease risk mostly improve with low-carb diets, but no one has felt safe recommending them for longer periods. (Note that low-carb diets don't necessarily have high levels of saturated fat.) So the researchers were trying to differentiate low-carb diets which had higher amounts of protein and fat from animal sources from those which had more protein and fat from vegetable sources.

The Bottom Line Results

There are several ways to look at the data from this study. At the very least, a low-carb diet, even if it included increased animal protein and animal fat, was not associated with an increased risk for heart disease. Eating a diet with a lower glycemic load and eating more fat from vegetable sources were both associated with reduced risk of heart attack for the women in the study. However, the media reports about this study haven't been entirely accurate. They tend to say things such as, "Heart risk was also 30 percent lower for participants who got their protein and fat from vegetables rather than from meat" (Forbes) and "Low-carb eating even seemed to be protective against heart disease when vegetables were the main sources of fat and protein in the diet." (CBS News) These statements are incorrect, as I will show in my analysis, as even the women who ate the most plant protein still got the majority of their protein from animal sources. For those who care about details of nutritional research and misinterpretations by the media, I invite you to continue to page two. If not, just remember two things:
  1. Eat a diet with a low glycemic load (see the Low Carb Food Pyramid)
  2. Get your fats from a variety of sources, including nuts, olive oil, and sources of omega-3 fats, but don't be concerned if you also choose to include sources of saturated fat.

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Do Low Fat Foods Taste Good?

Wednesday, September 28, 2011
It’s almost universally agreed that in most cases, low- or lower-fat versions of store-bought foods just don’t taste the same, and certainly not as good, as their full-fat counterparts. When fat is removed, something usually takes its place. This often involves adding a surprisingly long list of ingredients. Although some low-fat dairy products, such as plain low-fat yogurt and fat-free milk, are mostly additive-free, many other lower-fat or fat-free products are not.

Take cream cheese, for example. I have two tubs in my refrigerator: the regular version, which lists eight ingredients, and the fat-free version, which lists 15—almost twice as many! So what on earth is in the fat-free version?

Out with the Fat, In With the Sugar, Sodium and Gum

Sugar is near the top of the list in fat-free cream cheese. Emulsifiers—which help ingredients stick together—and thickeners account for most of the rest of the extra ingredients. For some reason, coloring is added, making what I thought was a perfectly white cream cheese, um, white. But sure, there’s no fat, and almost no cholesterol. Oddly, despite sugar’s high-placed listing, there’s only 1 gram of sugars per serving in the fat-free cream cheese, compared with 2 grams in regular cream cheese, which doesn’t list sugar at all (but sugar comes in many disguises, as our Low Carb Diets Guide can tell you). Sodium content is much higher in the fat-free version.

Simply put, fat’s function is to add flavor and texture to foods. Sugars, salts and chemical flavorings are routinely used to replace flavor in lower-fat products; and odd-sounding ingredients such as carrageenan, xanthan gum, locust bean gum, guar gum, sodium alginate, among many others, are added to thicken a product or hold it together. These special ingredients are called fat replacers, and can be derived from carbohydrate-, protein- or, funnily enough, fat-based sources (chemically modified, of course). With all these additives, it’s no wonder low-fat foods taste so different. Or do they? After all, the function of these fat replacers is to replicate the many qualities that fat gives to a food, including taste.

The Taste Test

My fourth-grader, who was looking for a fun science-fair project, thought it would be interesting to see if people really could taste the difference between full-fat foods and their reduced-fat/low-fat or fat-free counterparts, without knowing which was which beforehand. Her hypothesis was that in almost all instances, people would be able to taste a difference, and know which version was which. Her results, after testing 11 different foods on 11 people (a mix of kids and adults), were not so clear cut.

>>>See Next Page>>>


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Beet and Carrot Salad

Sunday, September 25, 2011

I was never a big fan of beets as a child, probably because the only way I was served them was from a jar. Roasted beets taste entirely different, as roasting them brings out the best in this earthy vegetable. Carrots complement the beets with their sweetness, which is enhanced by roasting. Enjoy this roasted beet and carrot salad atop a plate of fresh salad greens, and drizzle with a little lemon juice, or your favorite low-fat dressing.

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Yield: Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 pound (4 medium) beets
  • 3/4 pound carrots
  • 2 tbs lemon juice
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Preparation:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees

Pour olive oil in a medium bowl

Peel and chop beets into 1 ?-inch chunks; cut carrots on the diagonal into 1 ?-inch pieces

Toss beets and carrots in oil

Scatter on a rimmed baking sheet

Roast for 20 minutes or until beets and carrots are tender

Serve warm over 1 cup of salad greens

Drizzle with lemon juice and freshly ground pepper

Serves 4

Per Serving: Calories 75, Calories from Fat 22, Total Fat 2.4g (sat 0.3g), Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium 88mg, Carbohydrate 11.5g, Fiber 3.2g, Protein 3.2g


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Fat-Soluble Vitamins

Sunday, September 25, 2011
Definition: Fat-soluble vitamins are those which disperse and are stored in fat. Vitamins A, D, E, and K are fat-soluble vitamins. Some phytonutrients, such as the carotenoids (e.g. beta-carotene) are also fat-soluble.

Fat-soluble vitamins are stored in the body. Because they can build up over long periods of time, it's possible to develop a toxicity from too much. This is very unlikely to happen from food consumption (or in the case of Vitamin D, exposure to sun), but could happen by consuming large amounts in "mega" vitamin pills.

Consuming fat (including fat-containing foods) with food aids in absorption of fat-soluble vitamins and phytonutrients, however only small amounts of fat are required for this purpose.


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Whole Wheat Bread

Sunday, September 25, 2011
As I don't have a bread machine, I had been somewhat daunted by the prospect of making bread, 100% whole wheat bread in particular. There are too many accounts of hours of effort being rewarded by little more than a solid brick. So I read as much as I could about producing a nice, soft whole wheat loaf and put myself to work.

I should also add that I'm not a fan of most packaged whole-wheat breads in the U.S. It's generally too sweet. I finally came across Rudi's whole wheat bread, which passes my personal taste test for a not-too-sweet sandwich bread. I should explain: I don't lack a sweet tooth, it's just that whole wheat bread in England, where I grew up, is very much unsweetened. So my whole-wheat bread recipe has some honey, but not too much, and certainly no molasses. If you prefer a little more sweetness, feel free to add an extra tablespoon or two of honey, or add some molasses.

Tip: For a crispier top, place a brownie pan underneath the oven rack while the oven is preheating. Then when you place the loaf in to the oven, add a cup to a cup and a half of hot water to the brownie pan beneath. The resulting steam will help create a crispy crust.

Prep Time: 2?hours, 30?minutes

Cook Time: 30?minutes

Total Time: 3?hours

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 1 ? cups hot water
  • 2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 packet of active dry yeast
  • 3 ? cups whole wheat flour (gently spooned into measuring cups and leveled with a knife)

Preparation:

Combine liquid ingredients plus salt in a large bowl. Sprinkle yeast on top and mix.

Add one cup of flour and mix with a palette knife. Gradually add rest of flour, mixing as you go until the dough forms a soft ball.

Turn out dough on to lightly floured surface and with lightly floured hands knead for 8-10 minutes, adding a small amount of flour to the surface if the dough begins to stick.

Place dough ball in a lightly floured or lightly oiled large bowl. Cover and leave for 45 minutes to an hour. The dough should double in size.

Place dough on lightly floured surface again and knead just a few times to knock it down. Form a ball once again, return to glass bowl. Cover and allow to rise once again for 30 minutes.

Shape the dough into a rectangle and drop in to a lightly oiled or nonstick 9 inch by 5 inch loaf pan. Cover with a clean tea cloth and let rise for 45 minutes.

Bake in preheated 400 degree oven for 25-30 minutes.

Remove from pan and cool on a wire rack.

Yield One Loaf (14 slices). Calories Per Slice: 129, Calories from Fat 14, Total Fat 1.6g (0.2g), Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium 170mg, Carbohydrate Carbohydrate 24.5g, Fiber 3.8g, Protein 4.3g


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Beets: Two Vegetables for the Price of One

Sunday, September 25, 2011
I'm the only one in my family who likes beets. I haven't always liked them. As a child, I thought they came only in jars, and didn't much care for the overpowering vinegary taste. As an adult, I began to appreciate the real flavor of beets and their earthiness. Today I choose my beets at the local farmers market and enjoy thinking about how I want to cook and eat them. The nice thing with beets is that you get two vegetable dishes for the price of one. The greens are great in salads, or especially tasty when saut?ed in a little olive oil and garlic.

Beet Recipes

Marinated Beets Photo c 2011 Fiona Haynes, licensed to About.com

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Mediterranean Vegetables

Sunday, September 25, 2011

Nothing says "late summer" to me like cooking up a mix of farm-fresh eggplant, tomatoes, peppers, and squash, and seasoning it in a Mediterranean way. It's like the summer sun has been captured on my plate. This is similar to ratatouille, but has a slightly different texture and flavors. It is great cold as a salad the next day, or reheat for an omelet filling.

Ingredients:

  • ? cup olive oil
  • 1 small onion, chopped (about ? lb)
  • 1 lb eggplant, any variety, chopped into cubes
  • 1 large green or red bell pepper, chopped
  • ? lb. zucchini, chopped or sliced
  • 3 cloves garlic, pressed, grated, or minced
  • 3/4 lb tomatoes, fresh or canned and drained
  • 1/4 to 1/3 cup dry white wine, or can substitute vegetable or chicken broth
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 or 2 drops hot sauce, if desired
  • ? cup fresh chopped basil, or 1 T dried (but please get fresh if you can, it's a lot better)

Preparation:

In this vegetable saute, depending on the heat of the pan and the juiciness of the vegetables, they may begin to stick. If this happens, add a splash of the wine or broth to loosen it up.

1. Heat oil in pan with onion. When onion is well-sizzling, add eggplant and cook for 4 to 5 minutes. Sprinkle salt over all. Then add peppers, cook for 2 to 3 minutes, add zucchini, and cook for 2 to 3 minutes.

2. Push the vegetables out to the edges of the pan and cook the garlic in the center (you may need to add a bit more oil) for 30 to 60 seconds until fragrant.

3. Dump the tomatoes in and stir to release juice (again, this keeps everything from sticking). Add the rest of the wine or broth and dried basil if you're using it. Cook until tomatoes are fairly well broken-down. The eggplant should be pretty mushy.

4. Add black pepper and hot sauce, if you're using it. (Only a drop of hot sauce; you just want it to "perk up" the flavors, not be spicy.)

5. Taste and adjust seasonings. If tomato and wine are making it a bit acidic, or the flavors don't seem to be blending nicely, add a very small amount of sweetener -- no more than 1 teaspoon worth. You'll be amazed how this can change the whole dish.

6. Mix in the fresh basil, and take off heat.

How long you cook it after this point are really up to you. Sometimes I cook it down to concentrate the flavors and make it a lot less chunky. If you stop at this point, though, you should have about 4 cups of vegetables, making 8 servings.

Nutritional Information: Each serving has 5 grams effective carbohydrate plus 3.5 grams fiber, 2 grams protein, and 97 calories.


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Pumpkin Pie

Saturday, September 24, 2011

 Low Calorie Classic Pumpkin PieKimberley K. Eggleston

This recipe looks much like any traditional pumpkin pie recipe, with less sugar. The real calorie savings comes from the phyllo dough crust, which is made from a premade product that you can find in the frozen section at the grocery store.

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 55 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 10 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 7 sheet of 9x14 inch phyllo dough, thawed in refrigerator
  • Cooking spray
  • 1 15 oz. can of pumpkin
  • 1 12 oz. can 2% lowfat evaporated milk
  • 1/2 cup plus 2 Tbsp sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 large egg whites
  • 1 3/4 tsp pumpkin pie spice
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Preparation:

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2. Remove the phyllo dough from the refrigerator, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside.

3. In a large mixing bowl, combine all remaining ingredients,(pumpkin through salt) and mix well with a wire whisk.

4. Spray a 9-inch pie plate with non-stick cooking spray. Work with one phyllo sheet at a time, and cover the remaining sheets with plastic wrap. Lay one phyllo sheet in the pie plate with the edges hanging over the side. Spray the sheet with cooking spray. Repeat, layering the remaining sheets in the pie plate, placing them so that the entire bottom of the pie plate is covered, and all edges of the pie plate are covered as well.

5. Have a small dish of cold water handy. Wet you fingers, and fold the hanging edges of the phyllo dough inward, and press them along the edge of the pie plate to make a nice edging. Continue wetting your fingers as needed so that the phyllo dough does not crumble.

6. Pour the pumpkin mixture into the phyllo dough shell.

7. Bake the pie for 55 minutes, or until a knife inserted in the center of the pie comes out clean. Allow to cool completely, then serve or store in the refrigerator.

Optional: Top with a dollop of low fat whipped topping if desired.

Serves 8

Per Serving Calories 157


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