Fresh Ginger Tips

Monday, October 31, 2011
The best tip I ever got for using and storing ginger root is this simple secret: Keep it in the freezer (I use a zip-type bag). This means:
  • It grates really easily and finely (any grater will do, although I like the Microplane type best)
  • You don't have to peel it! I'm not kidding. The peel grates up so fine you don't have to worry about it, which means
  • Much less waste, so it lasts longer.
Try this and you will be a convert, I guarantee. It takes all of the hassle out of working with fresh ginger, and you don't end up biting down on pieces of ginger in your food.

One tablespoon fresh ginger has one gram of carbohydrate, and tons of flavor.


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Healthy Jambalaya

Sunday, October 30, 2011

This healthy jambalaya recipe isn't missing a thing with plump shrimp, spicy sausage, and cajun seasonings. It easily lends itself to a healthy meal.

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 38 minutes

Total Time: 53 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 8 oz. smoked chicken sausage, sliced into 1/2 inch coins
  • 8 oz. boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into bite sized pieces
  • 1 Tbsp canola oil
  • 1 cup chopped celery
  • 1/2 cup chopped green bell pepper
  • 1 clove minced garlic
  • 1 Tbsp fresh thyme
  • 1 1/2 cups long grain white rice
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 1 28-oz. can diced tomatoes, undrained
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1/8 tsp ground red pepper
  • 1 lb. shrimp, peeled

Preparation:

1. In a large dutch oven, cook the sausage and chicken over medium-high heat until browned. Remove and set aside.

2. Add the canola oil to the pan, and cook the celery, green pepper, and garlic for 3-5 minutes, until tender. Add the thyme and rice, and cook 3 more minutes. Stir in the chicken broth, tomatoes, salt, black pepper, and ground red pepper.

3. Cover, and cook 20 minutes, until the liquid is absorbed. Add the shrimp, and cook 3-5 minutes longer, until the shrimp is bright pink.

Serves 8

Calories Per Serving 293


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Mummy Dogs

Sunday, October 30, 2011

Typical recipes for these fun mummy dogs usually use refrigerator biscuits which are typically loaded with calories and additives. By making your own rolls to wrap around the hot dogs, you save a great deal of calories and end up with a far healthier meal item. You may even go so far as to use organic hot dogs, or a hot dog with no added preservatives for an extra health boost.

Prep Time: 1 hour, 20 minutes

Cook Time: 12 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 32 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup fat-free milk
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • 2 Tbsp sugar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/8 tsp active, dry yeast (1/2 package)
  • 1 large egg
  • 8, 97% fat-free all beef franks
  • 1 Tbsp prepared mustard

Preparation:

1. Place the milk, butter, sugar, and salt in a small saucepan, and heat over medium heat until the butter is melted.

2. Place 1 cup of flour and the yeast in a large bowl, and add the milk mixture. Stir until combined, and then add the egg. Beat on high for 2 minutes, then add the remaining 1 cup of flour. Mix until the dough forms a ball, then turn our the dough onto a flat, floured surface. Knead for about 8 minutes, or until the dough is smooth and elastic.

3. Place the dough in a large bowl coated with cooking spray, cover with a clean towel, and allow to raise for one hour or until doubled in size. Punch the dough down, and allow it to rest for 10 minutes.

4. Preheat the oven to 375°F.

5. Turn the dough out onto a flat, floured surface and roll into a large square. Cut the square into 8 strips.

6. Wrap each frank in one strip of dough, beginning at the top of the frank (leave a small gap in the wrapping for the mummy's "face") and wrapping the dough downward enclosing the frank. Place the wrapped frank on a large baking sheet coated with cooking spray.

7. Bake the franks for 12 minutes, or until the dough just starts to become golden.

8. Place the mummy dogs on a wire cooling rack and allow to cool for 5 minutes. Then, squirt two small dollops of mustard on the unwrapped portion of the frank to resemble eyes. Serve immediately.

Serves 8

Per Serving Calories 208


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Roasted Butternut Squash

Sunday, October 30, 2011

This is a naturally low fat fall side dish that would make a great accompaniment to a Thanksgiving dinner. Sometimes squash are hard to cut, but you can make this task easier by piercing it with a fork, then popping it in the microwave for 60 seconds before cutting into it.

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Total Time: 50 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 small butternut squash (2 lbs)
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup orange juice
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup

Preparation:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Using a sturdy knife, cut off the top of the butternut squash near the stem, then cut the butternut squash in half lengthwise. Scoop out seeds and membranes. Halve again, making four wedges.

Place wedges cut side up in a large glass baking dish. Sprinkle cinnamon on top. Combine orange juice and maple syrup and drizzle over squash wedges. Cover with foil and roast for 45 minutes. Spoon syrup over wedges before serving.

Serves 4

Per Serving: Calories 166, Calories from Fat 5, Total Fat 0.5g (Sat 0.1g), Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium 11mg, Carbohydrate 35.3g, Fiber 3.8g, Protein 3.4g


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Denmark's Fat Tax

Sunday, October 30, 2011
butterThis is what can happen with taxes. If taxing sugar brings in money while attempting to improve people's health, can a tax on saturated fat be far behind? This is the tax evolution that has happened in Denmark, with the stated goal of improving the health and longevity of Danes. The government has instated a tax of (if my conversions and calculations are correct) about $1.32 for every pound of saturated fat purchased. This applies to every food which is more than 2.3% saturated fat, including butter, milk, cheese, beef, bacon, and yogurt.

90% of the Denmark legislature voted for this tax. I can just imagine them, all sitting around similarly to the U.S.D.A. committee on Dietary Guidelines, never for a second seriously entertaining the idea that saturated fat could have been unfairly painted as a big villain.

Naturally, many aren't happy with the tax, and there are complaints that the tax is aimed not so much at improving health as in getting more revenues for the government.

Interestingly, many of the reports in the press point out that the health benefits of reducing saturated fats are dubious:

-BBC News: "However, some scientists think saturated fat may be the wrong target. They say salt, sugar and refined carbohydrates are more detrimental to health and should be tackled instead."

-CBS News, quoting Marion Nestle: "Nestle also questions the importance of saturated fat for lowering heart disease risk, which "remains to be proven."

-Time Magazine, quoting Arne Astrup: "You would think that people who ate a lot of cheese would have higher risks of cardiovascular disease, but research has shown that's not the case."

There are at least a couple of ironies inherent in Denmark's fat tax. One is that one of the almost-inevitable consequences is that butter will be replaced with seed oils such as corn and soy oils, which are high in omega-6 fats, and can contributed to chronic inflammation in the body. This inflammation seems to be an underlying factor in heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, and many more. The same thing can happen when people replace fats with carbs.

Another irony is that Denmark's neighbor Sweden has been increasing butter consumption recently, occasionally to the point of shortages. A few years ago, the government there did a careful review of the literature around diet and put out the word: low-carb high-fat diets can be positive, and saturated fats are not to be feared. Since then, the LCHF diet has become very popular there, and people are raving about the improvements in their health. There aren't many fat people in Denmark now; I only hope this move doesn't actually cause the country to end up with more of them.

Living in the U.S., I hope that our leaders don't get any ideas from Denmark.

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Stop Drinking Sugary Drinks

Sunday, October 30, 2011
There's no doubt about it - consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages has skyrocketed in recent decades, particularly in the United States. What was once an occasional treat has become a normal part of the diet for many in the U.S., with some estimates as high as 8% of daily calories coming from soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages.

Why Not Drink Sodas and Sugary Drinks?

There is increasing evidence overconsumption of these drinks is associated with weight gain, insulin resistance, and diabetes. Many studies have shown that drinking sugary drinks doesn't depress the appetite as much as food containing the same number of calories.

How Much Sugar is in Soda and Other Soft Drinks?

Sugar-sweetened soda, fruit drinks, sweetened iced teas, and other beverages with added sugar usually contain about 6 or 7 teaspoons of sugar in each cup of drink. A 12 oz. can of regular (not diet) soda has about 10 teaspoons of sugar in it. This is about the same as the total added sugars the USDA recommends that the average person consume in a whole day. People with diabetes and related disorders should almost certainly consume much less.

What are Added Sugars?

There are a lot of ingredients which mean "sugar" - everything from high fructose corn syrup to "evaporated cane juice". Most of them are about half fructose and half glucose. Fructose in an of itself may be related to such problems as weight gain, high blood triglycerides, and diabetes. Added sugars are in most processed foods, from obviously sweet foods (cookies, candies, etc.) to ketchup to crackers. However, it's hard to think of any other food that will deliver as much sugar to our bodies as quickly as sugary drinks.

What About Sports Drinks?

The ads would have you believe that active, healthy people should drink sports drinks to keep them active and healthy! However did we get along without them before? We got along without them because for the most part we do not need them! (Very heavy exercisers can benefit from some of the ingredients in sports drinks, though.) Sports drinks are made of water, sugar, flavorings, sodium, and potassium. You can get exactly the same amount of sodium and potassium by adding 2 tablespoons of lemon juice and a small pinch of salt to a cup of water.

What About Juice?

If drinking a lot of drinks with added sugars is bad, what about juice, which only contains natural sugars? Although most juices have about the same amount of sugar as soda, some fruit juices do have some benefits. Some things to think about:

- When a fruit is squeezed for juice, many valuable nutrients are often left behind. Fiber is always removed, and often vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients are as well. Apple juice has only a small fraction of the nutrients in the original apple - it is essentially not much different than sugar water. Moral: Eat the fruit.

- Juices with the least amount of sugar are tomato, vegetable, and cranberry (though usually quite a lot of sugar is added to cranberry juice - "diet" cranberry juice has no added sugar, but "light" cranberry juice as some added sugar, and regular cranberry juice "cocktail" has lots of sugar).

- The juices with the least nutritional value are apple, white grape, and pear. Note that these are often used to create "100% juice blends" with other juices. In concentrate form, they are sometimes used as "natural" sugar substitutes, although they are pretty much the same as sugar.

- Juices with the most nutritional value include orange juice, purple grape juice, cranberry juice, tomato juice, and vegetable juices. Since orange and grape juice are so sugary, try diluting with plain or sparkling water.

What To Drink Instead

If you drink sugar-sweetened drinks on a regular basis, finding alternatives could be the best single diet change you can make. But what can you drink instead? Water is the obvious and best choice, but the idea of going "cold turkey" to only drinking water is too big a change for some. Although there are arguments against diet soda, it is almost certainly better than the sugar-sweetened kind. There are also flavored sparkling waters on the market, or flavor your water or sparkling water with mint, fruit, etc. Here are more ideas for alternatives to sugar-sweetned beverages.

What is your favorite sugar-free beverage? Contribute your suggestion below!
Sources:

  • Malik, V.S., Popkin, B.M., et al (2010). "Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Risk of Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes: A meta-analysis". Diabetes Care 33(11):2477-2483
  • Malik, V.S.; Schulze, M.B.; Hu, F.B. (2006). "Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain: a systematic review". American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 84 (2): 274–28.
  • Schulze, M.B.; Manson, J.A.E.; Ludwig, D.S.; Colditz, G.A.; Stampfer, M.J.; Willet, W.C.; Hu, F.B. (2004). "Sugar-sweetened beverages, weight gain, and incidence of type 2 diabetes in young and middle aged women.". Journal of the American Medical Association 292 (8): 927–934
  • USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21.
  • Vartanian, L.R.; Schwartz, M.B.; Brownell, K.D. (2007). "Effects of soft drink consumption on nutrition and health: a systematic review and meta-analysis". American Journal of Public Health 97 (4): 667–675.

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Lower Fat Buttermilk Biscuits

Sunday, October 30, 2011
As a Brit living in the United States, I still have a hard time with the whole biscuit/cookie thing. To me, biscuits are what Americans call cookies, to be dunked in tea; and what I call scones are closer to what Americans call biscuits (and happily pour gravy over). I may be missing out, but I can't quite bring myself to pour gravy over something that looks to me as though it needs a generous spread of jam or honey. No matter. Here's a recipe for flaky buttermilk biscuits, to be enjoyed with gravy or with some honey, depending on your taste.

Buttermilk Biscuits Photo c 2011 Fiona Haynes, licensed to About.com


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Make it Meatless

Saturday, October 29, 2011
Going meatless once or twice a week is a great way to save fat and calories, especially if you're replacing meals that feature red meat, such as hamburgers, chili con carne, or steak. Meatless meals can be just as hearty as meat-centered ones, so long as they contain a good amount of protein and fiber. You may have heard of Meatless Monday, a campaign to help people eat more healthfully and be more environmentally aware. So why not commit to eating meatless meals at least once a week? To get you started, here are 10 low fat meatless recipes.

Curried Chick Peas and Tomatoes c Fiona Haynes, licensed to About.com


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Curried Chick Peas and Tomatoes

Saturday, October 29, 2011

Going meatless once in a while is good for our bodies, and a great way to eat cheaply. This curried chick peas and tomatoes recipe is super-fast and super-flavorful, thanks to the curry spices and especially the fresh ginger. Enjoy this healthy curried chick peas and tomatoes dish over microwaveable whole-grain rice.

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Total Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 tsp canola oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 inch fresh ginger, finely chopped
  • 1 tbsp curry powder
  • 1 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes
  • 2 15-ounce cans reduced-sodium chick peas, drained and rinsed
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley

Preparation:

Heat oil on medium heat in large skillet.

Add garlic, onion and ginger. Cook for 2-3 minutes, until onion softens.

Stir in curry powder and cook for 1 minute.

Add tomatoes and chick peas, and simmer for 10 minutes.

Stir in parsley, then serve.

Serves 6

Per Serving: Calories 252, Calories from Fat 53, Total Fat 3.6g (sat 0.4g), Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium 601mg, Carbohydrate 49.1g, Fiber 9.6g, Protein 9.7g


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Insulin Resistance

Saturday, October 29, 2011
Definition: An insensitivity of the cells to the effects of insulin. Since one of the "jobs" of insulin is to "open the gates" so that the cells will take in glucose (either using it or converting it to storage), blood glucose will stay higher than is healthy unless the body releases more insulin, creating a condition called hyperinsulinemia ("too much insulin in the blood"). High insulin, in turn, can lead to other problems, including weight gain, because high insulin levels tend to facilitate the storage of fat, and makes it more difficult for the body to access fat for energy.

It is estimated that 20-30 percent of the US population is insulin resistant. Insulin resistance is part of the constellation of symptoms called metabolic syndrome, and is considered to be a precursor to Type 2 diabetes (in fact, some doctors give an insulin-resistant person a diagnosis of diabetes, albeit in an early stage). Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

More Information about Insulin Resistance

Pronunciation: IN se lin ree SIS tents

Also Known As: pre-diabetes, insulin insensitivity

Common Misspellings: inselin resistence insolin

Examples:

According to some studies, people who are insulin resistant respond most positively to a controlled-carbohydrate diet.

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Make it Meatless

Saturday, October 29, 2011
Cutting out meat once or twice a week can cut our overall fat intake considerably, especially if we replace our weekly red meat options. Of course, not all vegetarian meals are low fat. Macaroni and cheese is a good example. In many cases, it's a matter of choosing some beans or legumes for lean protein, and supplementing them with grains and vegetables. True, cheese features prominently in many vegetarian meals. By all means use it, but use it sparingly. A little strong-flavored cheese can go a long way.

Curried Chick Peas and Tomatoes

Curried Chick Peas and TomatoesFiona Haynes

This curried chick peas and tomatoes dish, mostly made with ingredients you'll likely have in your pantry, is super-quick and easy to prepare. It's also super-flavorful, thanks to the curry spices and fresh ginger, if you have it. If speed is your goal, serve this dish with microwaveable whole grain rice or naturally fast-cooking couscous.

Black Bean Chipotle Chili

Black Bean Chipotle ChiliFiona Haynes

The heat and smokiness of chipotle pepper adds a depth of flavor to this satisfying black bean chili. Be sure to use only one chili from the can and just a little of the sauce. Serve this warming chili with a ollop of fat-free plain yogurt on top and garnish with a little cilantro.

Quinoa-Stuffed Peppers

Quinoa-Stuffed PeppersFiona Haynes
Not only are these quinoa-stuffed peppers a great low-fat meal option for vegetarians, they're also ideal if you need to eat gluten free -- though be sure to check the the vegetable broth brand to make sure yours is suitable for celiacs. Quinoa is a a nice alternative to rice, and a better source of protein, too.

Spinach and Ricotta Pasta

Low Fat Spinach and Ricotta PastaFiona Haynes

This spinach and ricotta is a nice creamy dish that still manages to be low fat. It's also super quick and easy to make so you can have dinner on the table in under 15 minutes.

Potato Spinach Frittata

Reduced Fat Potato Spinach FrittataFiona Haynes
A frittata is a fancy word for an open-face omelet, which is often finished under a broiler. This hearty spinach and potato frittata, which is made using egg substitute, needs nothing more than a green salad and some whole grain bread to make a complete meal.

Light and Creamy Mushroom Lasagna

Light and Creamy Mushroom LasagnaFiona Haynes

Spinach, mushrooms and creamy low-fat ricotta cheese form the heart of this lasagna. This is comfort food with a little less guilt. This is also a great dish to prepare and assemble ahead of time so all you have to do is pop it int the oven when you get home from work. Another time saver, of course, is to use no-boil noodles.

Chick Pea Patties with Lemon Yogurt Dressing

Chickpea PattiesFiona Haynes

These delicate and flavorful chick pea patties pair make a nice lower-fat alternative to falafel. Serve with whole-wheat pitas and a green salad on the side.

Quinoa and Edamame Salad

Quinoa and Edamame SaladFiona Haynes

This super-nutritious quinoa and edamame salad makes a great light meal option, and one that happens to be gluten free, so long as the broth you choose to cook the quinoa in is gluten free. Kitchen Basics and Pacific Foods are two examples of gluten-free broths.

Asparagus Strata

Light Asparagus StrataFiona Haynes

This light asparagus strata contains a blend of eggs and egg substitute, uses nonfat milk and reduced fat cheese. It also uses whole wheat bread for an extra nutritional boost. The result is still a wonderfully delicious casserole you'll want to make again and again. the other beauty of this strat is that you can make it ahead of time so all you have to do is pop it in the oven when you get home.

Baked Pumpkin Pasta

Baked Pumpkin PastaFiona Haynes
You might think of pumpkin pie, pumpkin bread and pumpkin muffins, but how about pumpkin pasta? There are, of course, many things you can make using pumpkin. Mildly spiced, pumpkin makes a great addition to pasta, which it makes it a great option for a fall meal. Of course if you want to add some heat, then up the spices a bit!

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How to Toast Pumpkin Seeds

Saturday, October 29, 2011

The pumpkin carving ritual wouldn't be complete without the smells and crunching of roasted pumpkin seeds! This also works for squash seeds, including spaghetti squash.

Ingredients:

  • Pumpkin or squash seeds
  • If you want to add salt or seasonings, you'll need a bit of oil so it will stick

Preparation:

Preheat oven to 350 F. (or seed below for lower slower method).

1) Clean the pulp off the pumpkin seeds (or squash seeds), and dry with paper towels.

2) If desired, toss with a little olive or other oil. You only need enough to barely coat, otherwise, they will be greasy. Add salt and any kind of seasoning you want - garlic powder, Cajon seasoning, dried chile powder, or whatever sounds good to you!

3) Cover a baking sheet with parchment paper and spread the seeds out in one layer.

Bake for 3-5 minutes, until seeds just start to color and are fragrant. Sometimes I use a longer but safer method of using a lower temperature. If you roast the seeds at 250 degrees F., you don't have to watch them as carefully. It takes about 45 -60 minutes.

Nutritional information: Pumpkin seeds are packed with nutrition, but I am not satisfied with being totally clear on the carb count. I think you can safely count them as having 5 grams of usable carb and 2 grams of fiber for 1/4 cup. The counts I'm finding vary a lot if the outer shell has been removed (these are called pepitas), and the fiber information isn't always analyzed. The above numbers are based on the best information I can find.


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Black Bean Chipotle Chili

Saturday, October 29, 2011
This black bean chipotle chili is actually one of my all-time favorite winter recipes. The smokiness and heat imparted by the chipotle chile adds a great depth of flavor to this hearty and delicious vegetarian dish.

If you've never used chipotle chiles in Adobo sauce before, be careful to use just one chile and a little of the sauce. If you make the mistake of emptying the whole can, you'll be in for something of a fiery surprise. The leftovers from the can of chiles can be bagged and kept in the freezer until you want to whip up another batch of black bean chipotle chili.

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 35 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 tsp canola oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, smashed
  • 1 cup finely chopped onion
  • 1 medium yellow or red pepper, diced
  • 1 tbsp chili powder
  • 2 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp dried oregano
  • 2 15-ounce cans of low-sodium black beans
  • 2 14.5-ounce can of fire-roasted crushed tomatoes (such as Muir Glen)
  • 1 chipotle chile from a can, finely chopped, and 1 tbsp Adobo sauce
  • 1/4 cup fresh chopped cilantro
  • Nonfat plain Greek yogurt for topping (optional)

Preparation:

Heat oil on medium-low heat in a large pan.

Saute garlic, onions and chopped pepper until softened. Add chili powder, cumin and oregano, followed by black beans, tomatoes and chipotle chile with sauce.

Bring to a boil, then simmer for 10 minutes. Add cilantro. Simmer for 5 more minutes.

Serve in bowls with a dollop of fat-free Greek yogurt on top and a side of corn bread.

Makes 4-6 servings

Per Serving: Calories 332, Calories from Fat 33, Total Fat 3.6g (sat 0.3g), Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium 382mg, Carbohydrate 58.7g, Fiber 15.4g, Protein 16.1g


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My Review of the Dukan Diet

Friday, October 28, 2011
dukanI'm generally not eager to read about The Latest Popular Diet, since they come and go so quickly. But people have been asking me about the Dukan Diet all year, so I finally read the book. It turns out that the Dukan diet is low in both carbs and fats, which automatically gets me on my guard. I spend a lot of my Dukan Diet Review on that issue. Although this diet has some positive aspects, I'm not crazy about it. And some of the ideas in it are downright goofy.

Image Courtesy of Pricegrabber

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Sonoma Diet Food Lists

Friday, October 28, 2011

Whole Grains

During Wave One, two servings of whole grains are allowed each day (one seems to be mandatory). During Wave Two, three or four daily servings are allowed - at least two seem to be mandatory.

Whole Grain Servings must be 100% whole grain and can consist of:

1) Whole grain bread - must say 100% whole wheat or other whole grain - every grain listed on the label must say "whole". Each slice of bread must have at least two grams of fiber. Bread including cracked wheat is even better.

2) Whole grain cereals - Cereals must also be entirely of whole grains. Additionally, each serving should have at least 8 grams of fiber. This means that the cereal must have added bran. For example "Total" is whole grain, but there is not enough fiber to qualify, as whole grains alone aren't high enough in fiber.

3) Whole grain pasta - Again, make sure it is totally whole grain. ? cup is one serving. Soba noodles which are 100% buckwheat are one whole-grain option.

4) Cooked whole grains (serving=? cup), including:

  • Barley
  • Brown, red, or black rice
  • Bulgar
  • Oats - groats, rolled oats, groats, or oat bran
  • Quinoa
  • Wheat berries or cracked wheat
  • Wild rice

5) Popcorn - As part of a snack, popcorn can be included, if air-popped and without butter.

Dairy Products

Wave One:
  • Low Fat Cottage Cheese can be used as a protein
  • Up to one cup of fat free milk per day is allowed
  • One ounce of Parmesan or Mozzarella cheese is allowed

In Wave Two, one cup of plain fat-free yogurt can be added.

Beans and Other Legumes

Beans and other legumes, such as those on this list, are allowed, although limited to ? cup per day in Wave One.

Fats, Oils, and Nuts

Up to three servings per day from the following list:
  • Olive oil, 1 teaspoon
  • Canola oil, 1 teaspoon
  • Avocado, ?
  • Almonds, 11
  • Peanuts, 14
  • Pecans, 10 halves
  • Walnuts, 7 halves

Also, in Wave 2, 2 Tablespoons peanut butter can be used as a protein, or 1 Tablespoon as part of a snack

Condiments and Sauces

Condiments and sauces that avoid sugars and saturated fats are the key. Low Carb Condiment List

Beverages

The following beverages are allowed during Wave One of the Sonoma Diet:
  • Water, plain or sparkling
  • Tea - black, green, or herbal, no cream or sugar
  • Coffee - black, or with up to 2 packets artificial sweetener per day and/or up to 1 Tablespoon heavy cream per day

Artificially sweetened drinks such as diet soda are discouraged, but allowed, up to two cans per day.

For Wave Two, 6 ounces of wine per day can be added

Return to Page One

Page Three - Sonoma Diet Forbidden Foods


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Light and Creamy Mushroom Lasagna

Friday, October 28, 2011

A light yet creamy meatless lasagna filled with mushrooms, low-fat ricotta cheese, spinach, and tomato sauce, makes a welcome meal for a crowd. Filling and delicious, you won't miss the meat. You can cut fat further by making one of the ricotta cheese tubs listed a fat free one. To save time in the evening, prepare and assemble the lasagna ahead of time, and bake later. Another time saver, of course, is to use no-boil noodles.

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour

Total Time: 1 hour, 15 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 9 lasagna noodles
  • 2 15-ounce tubs low-fat ricotta cheese (I used Frigo)
  • 3 egg whites
  • 1 10-ounce box frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 2 tsp olive oil
  • 2 8-ounce packs sliced cremini mushrooms
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 26-ounce jar fat-free, low-sodium marinara sauce (I like either Amy's or Trader Joe's brands)
  • 1/2 cup finely shredded part-skim mozzarella

Preparation:

Heat oven to 375 degrees. Coat a 9 x 13 inch baking dish with nonstick cooking spray.

Cook noodles according to instructions on back of package. If using no-cook noodles, set aside for later.

Combine egg whites, ricotta cheese, spinach and herbs in a large bowl. Stir well.

Heat oil on medium in large skillet. Add mushrooms and cook for 5 minutes, until they begin to release their liquid. Drain almost all excess liquid, then add garlic and cook for 3-4 minutes.

Spread a thin layer of marinara sauce (a half cup or so) on the bottom of the baking dish.

Arrange a layer of lasagna noodles on top. Add half the ricotta mixture, followed by half the garlicky mushrooms. Then add half the remaining tomato sauce followed by second layer of noodles.

Spread remaining ricotta mixture, followed by mushrooms, and top with remaining noodles. Finish with remaining tomato sauce.

Top with shredded cheese.

Cover and bake for 40 minutes; uncover and bake for 10 minutes more.

Let the lasagna rest for 10 minutes before cutting

Makes 10 servings.

Per Serving: Calories 260 , Calories from Fat 62, Total Fat 6.9g (sat 3.7g), Cholesterol 32mg, Sodium 302mg, Carbohydrate 31.1g, Fiber 2.4g, Protein 18.4g


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Pizza Dough

Friday, October 28, 2011
I almost always regret ordering in pizza or bringing a pizza home from the store. Either the crust isn't right or the sauce isn't right, or it's cold and soggy, or something else is wrong. Plus, it can get expensive, especially if we can't agree on toppings and end up buying more than one pie. So we decided we'd be better off making our own. This means we have control over the pizza's ingredients, we can divide up a pie so that it caters to all tastes (my kids want just cheese and not too much sauce; I want less cheese and lots of vegetables). Equally important, we can serve it hot from the oven. We've also discovered that making pizza is fun to do. One of my daughters likes to roll it out; the other likes to slice mushrooms and whatever other toppings we might want.

So here's a recipe for a basic pizza dough, which is virtually fat free and absolutely delicious. Top it as you wish, but be sparing with the cheese and generous with the veggies! This pizza dough, made with bread flour, is super-easy to work with, and routinely makes a 12-inch pie. You can, of course, replace some of the bread flour with some whole wheat flour for an added nutritional boost. This may affect the texture a little, but the pizza will still be satisfying. You can also add some dried herbs into the dry ingredients for added flavor. Finally, you can make the dough ahead of time. After you have punched it down once the dough has risen, simply wrap in floured plastic wrap and refrigerate until ready to use.

Prep Time: 1?hour, 15?minutes

Cook Time: 12?minutes

Total Time: 1?hour, 27?minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 1 pkg active dry yeast
  • ? cup warm water (100-110 degrees)
  • 2 cups bread flour
  • ? tsp salt

Preparation:

Dissolve honey and yeast in warm water. Leave for 10 minutes until frothy.

In a large bowl stir flour and salt together. Add yeast mixture and stir with a palette knife until a dough ball forms.

Turn out on to floured surface and knead for 5 minutes or until smooth and elastic. Form a ball and place in a lightly floured large bowl. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and a damp tea cloth. Let dough rise in a warm place for 1 hour, until doubled in size.

Remove dough from bowl and punch down on lightly floured surface. Roll into 12-inch circle and place on a lightly oiled baking sheet . Top with favorite toppings and bake in a 450-degree oven for 10-13 minutes until golden.

Yields one 12 inch crust.

Serving size: 1/12 of crust.

Per serving: Calories 89, Calories from Fat 3, Total Fat 0.4g (sat0.1g), Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium 98mg, Fiber, 0.7g, Protein 3g


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Getting Ready for Halloween

Sunday, October 23, 2011
halloween It's that time of year - Halloween is on its way! There are lots of tricks to staying low-carb and sugar-free on Halloween. If you are planning to make your own sugar-free candy, check for special ingredients you may need to you can stock up ahead of time. For example, if I'm making candy with chocolate, I make sure I have erythritol in the house.

For those with enough willpower to just eat one or two pieces, I have compiled a list of the Carbs and Calories in Halloween Candy so you can check out your favorites.

Photo: LWA/Getty Images

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Watermelon Salad with Cucumber

Sunday, October 23, 2011

This salad is so refreshing, delicious, and easy to make. Because it is different, people like it at potlucks, and you can easily adjust it to make many portions or a few. Basically, it's half watermelon and half cucumber, with a sprinkling of mint and feta cheese. The saltiness of the cheese makes a surprisingly delicious contrast to the watermelon.

Prep Time: 15?minutes

Total Time: 15?minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups chopped watermelon
  • 2 cups chopped cucumber
  • 1/4 cup minced fresh mint
  • 1/3 cup crumbled feta cheese

Preparation:

Mix watermelon, cucumber, and most of the mint and cheese together. Sprinkle remaining mint and cheese on top. Garnish with whole mint leaves if desired.

Nutritional Information: Each of 8 servings has 3.5 grams effective carbohydrate plus 1 gram fiber, 1 gram protein, and 33 calories.


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Low Carb at College

Sunday, October 23, 2011
Are you starting or returning to college? Do you worry that you'll end up carrying more weight around with you than just those textbooks? One way to avoid the "Freshman 15" is to pay attention to the amount of carbohydrate you're eating.

The College Carb Trap

When you're suddenly away from home, it's easy to indulge in lots of sugary and starchy foods, both because they are "fun foods" and also because they are often convenient. For a late-night study break, you could find yourself hitting the vending machine for a snack. In the morning, those bagels are an easy thing to grab on the way to class. There are unlimited desserts in the cafeteria, and the snack bar is stocked mostly with muffins and cookies. These refined carbs can really pile on the weight at an alarming rate. Especially when trying to establish new routines, you may easily fall into bad habits which can be harder to change later on.

On the other hand, my daughter, a college freshman at this writing, tells me that she thinks it can be easier in some ways to follow a special diet at college, because a relatively large selection of foods is available and already prepared for you. If you make wise choices, you can avoid the College Carb Trap.

New Choices in the Cafeteria

When I was in college 35 years ago, the choices in the cafeteria often weren't all that varied, let alone appetizing. More recently, I've had the opportunity to visit the cafeterias in 10-12 colleges in the U.S. On the negative side, there is more of a presence of fast-food outlets on college campuses. On the other hand, I'm happy to report that on most campuses there are many positive trends. There is more of an emphasis on fresh fruits and vegetables, and less processed food in general on many campuses. Also, there is a trend of breaking foods down into components so you can mix and match to your liking. For example:

Salad Bars - Almost every cafeteria has them now, with more and more choices. Stay away from the potato and macaroni salads, and go for a rainbow of fresh vegetables and lots of greens. Tip: Many low-fat and fat-free dressings are loaded with sugar - often over a teaspoon for sugar in every tablespoon of dressing! You can ask one of the people in the cafeteria for information on which dressings have less sugar. Or, even better, just use olive oil with lemon or vinegar and salt and pepper. Some oil on your salad is a good thing, as it turns out that some oil on your salad will help your body absorb many of the nutrients. If you want a "light" salad, toss it with an oil-based dressing (instead of just dumping dressing on the top) and you'll find it doesn't take much to coat the leaves. On the other hand, when cutting carbs you'll want to be increasing your fat intake somewhat, and salads are a good place to do this. More on Healthy Salad Dressings

Stir Fry Bars - This is perhaps the most exciting recent development for students who are watching their carbs. In these set-ups you can choose which proteins and vegetables you want to combine. Some cafeterias let you cook it yourself, while in others the staff will cook it for you. This Low-Carb Vegetable List can help you choose.

Pasta Bars - If there's no stir-fry bar, there might be a pasta bar, where you can choose what to put on pasta. The good news is, you can choose to have those things NOT on pasta! Or, if you can't bear to imagine life with no pasta, ask for a small amount of whole wheat pasta.

Six General Rules for College Eating

If you follow these guidelines, you will greatly reduce your intake of problematic foods. Of course, if you are following a specific low-carb diet plan such as Atkins or South Beach you'll want to follow the rules of that plan.

1. Focus on the basics: protein, vegetables, and some fruit. If you make sure you are getting enough of these foods, it will make it much easier to avoid the sundae bar.

2. Foods to avoid: basically, sugary and starchy foods: desserts, candy, sweetened beverages, breads, potatoes, rice, pasta, cereal, etc. Check out my Low-Carb Food Pyramid for more help.

3. Don't be afraid of fat. With all the low-fat and fat-free versions of foods prevalent today, this can be a challenge at times. Look for foods such as avocado, olives and olive oil, nuts, peanut butter, and, yes, even butter. As Dr. Richard Feinman, an expert in nutrition and biochemistry, states, "The deleterious effects of fat have been measured in the presence of high carbohydrate. A high-fat diet in the presenceof high carbohydrate is different than a high-fat diet in the presence of low carbohydrate." In other words, if you watch your carbs, don't worry about eating more fat.

4. Get a small refrigerator for your room. A refrigerator, as well as a few well-chosen staples, can be an enormous help in staying away from the chips and pizza. For example, if you keep a jar of mayonnaise and some lettuce in your fridge you can make tuna salad and wrap it in lettuce.

Flax seed meal is a great food to keep in your fridge. Put some in a small zip-type bag, and then at the cafeteria you can put it in a bowl and add hot water, and some peanut butter (if it's too goopy, just add more water). Or add it to plain yogurt with some nuts and fruit.

Check this Low-Carb Snack List for more ideas of food to keep in your room.

5. Use the kitchen if available. If you can prepare simple foods such as hard-boiled eggs or low-carb pizza, you can greatly expand your food choices.

6. Be extra-careful about beverages. Almost all of the "healthy" beverages sold these days have a lot of sugar in them, so read labels carefully. Also, bottled sugary cocktails are popular these days. If you are going to drink alcoholic beverages, get familiar with the carbs in them.

In addition, if you are new to low-carb eating, you'll want to get support. Sign up for our newsletter and join us in our Low-Carb Forum. That way you'll always have someone to turn to with questions or help with the special challenges that college can bring. And above all else, have a great and healthy semester!

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A Basic Pizza Dough Recipe

Sunday, October 23, 2011
Pizza is not a health food, for sure, but it's nice to indulge from time to time. Delivery pizza or carry out pizza is usually a disappointment, plus it's usually on the cold side by the time it gets home, and often more than a little soggy. The solution, other than not eating pizza, is to make your own. This means you get to control the ingredients, and you can eat it while it's hot. So here's a recipe for a basic pizza dough that needs no added fat. Of course, what you put on top is up to you. If you're eating low fat, go easy on the cheese, and be generous with the veggies. The pizza that's pictured caters to the grown-ups' request for a veggie-based one and my kids' pleas for cheese only.

Homemade Pizza Ready for the Oven c 2011 Fiona Haynes, licensed to About.com


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Turkey Wrap

Sunday, October 23, 2011

This turkey wrap recipe calls for deli-roasted turkey breast and sweet cranberries that you can enjoy any time of the year. However, if it is near Thanksgiving time, consider this turkey wrap for utilizing those turkey and cranberry leftovers. Whenever you choose to make it, enjoy this wrap as a quick and delicious lunchtime meal.

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Total Time: 5 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 Tbsp dried cranberries
  • 2 Tbsp fat-free cream cheese, at room temperature
  • 1 8-inch whole grain tortilla
  • 2 oz. deli-style roasted turkey breast
  • 1/2 cup shredded romaine lettuce

Preparation:

1. Place the cranberries in a small microwave-safe bowl. Cover them with a small amount of water, and microwave on high for 15 seconds, just the soften the skins. Drain the water off. Mix the cranberries with the cream cheese.

2. Spread the cranberry and cream cheese mixture down the center of the tortilla. Next layer the turkey and lettuce on the tortilla.

3. Beginning with one end of the tortilla, wrap into a tube, folding the ends in towards the middle to keep the turkey and lettuce in place. Slice in half if you wish.

Serves 1

Per Serving Calories 203


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Pumpkin Bread Pudding

Saturday, October 22, 2011

Here's a great seasonal pumpkin bread pudding that will fill your kitchen with a wonderful aroma. We like ours with raisins, but feel free to use dried cranberries. One of our favorite ways of eating this pudding is with a drizzle of good-quality maple syrup, which is why this dessert would also make a pretty good brunch dish.

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Total Time: 60 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 10.5 ounce day-old ounce baguette
  • 2 cups fat-free half and half
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 3/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar
  • 1 cup pure pumpkin
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/4 tsp ginger
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp cloves
  • 3/4 cup raisins (or dried cranberries)

Preparation:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray an 11 X 7 baking dish with nonstick cooking spray.

Cut baguette into 1 inch slices, then into cubes. Place in a large bowl and cover with the half and half, tossing the bread cubes to allow the liquid to soak in.

In a medium bowl, combine beaten eggs, brown sugar, pumpkin, vanilla and spices. Add to bread mixture with raisins and blend well.

Pour into baking dish and bake for 40-45 minutes.

Serves 8.

Per Serving: Calories 286, Calories from Fat 29, Total Fat 3.2g (sat 1.2g), Cholesterol 56mg, Sodium 335mg, Carbohydrate 57.2g, Fiber 1.9g, Protein 7g


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Mummy Dogs

Saturday, October 22, 2011

Mummy Dogs

Are you starting to think about your Halloween menu? These mummy dogs are so easy and fun to make. Kids love them, and I have to admit that I love them too!

Photo@ Kimberley K. Eggleston, licensed to About.com, Inc


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Crock Pot Chicken Stew

Saturday, October 22, 2011

This crock pot chicken stew recipes is a favorite of ours on a cool autumn day. Nothing warms you up quite like a hearty bowl of warm chicken stew.

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 6 minutes

Total Time: 16 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup chopped onion ( 1 medium)
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced fine
  • 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breast, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 1 32-oz. carton chicken broth
  • 2 1/4 cups water
  • 2 cups chopped carrot
  • 1 cup chopped celery
  • 1/2 tsp dried thyme
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/4 flour

Preparation:

1. Spray a non-stick skillet with cooking spray. Add the onion and garlic, and cook for four minutes.

2. In a 4-quart crock pot, combine the onion and garlic with the chicken breast, chicken broth, 2 cups of water, and the next 4 ingredients. Cook on low for 5-6 hours, making sure the vegetables and soft.

3. Whisk together the remaining 1/4 cup of water with 1/4 cup of flour.Add the flour mixture to the crock pot, and cook and additional 1/2 hour, until the stew is thickened.

Serves 4

Per Serving Calories 179


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Spinach Omelette

Saturday, October 22, 2011

Add the egg substitute mixture the to pan, and lightly stir until the eggs begin to set (about 10 seconds).

Using a rubber spatula, lift the edges of the omelet as it cooks, and tilt the pan, allowing uncooked egg to slide underneath the cooked portion. Continue until all of the egg is cooked. (about 1 minute)


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Wish-Bone Salad Spritzers

Saturday, October 22, 2011

The Bottom Line

If you want to add some flavor to your salad without all that fat, Wish-Bone Salad Spritzers may be the perfect solution.

Pros

  • Easy to control serving size
  • Only one calorie per spray, and 10 calories to dress a one-cup salad
  • Each 7-ounce bottle dresses more salads than a regular pour-on 16-ounce bottle of salad dressing
  • Flavor with very little fat

Cons

  • Leading ingredients are either high-fructose corn syrup or water
  • Italian Spritzer was too sweet for my liking

Description

  • Wish-Bone Salad Spritzers come in nine flavors.
  • Each 7-ounce bottle contains about 260 sprays, enough to cover 26 one-cup salads.
  • Each flavor contains a combination of water, high-fructose corn syrup, oil, vinegar and flavorings.

Guide Review - Wish-Bone Salad Spritzers

Many a healthy salad has been ruined by adding too much dressing. We're used to pouring on dressing, drizzling it (which seems to me a fancier way of pouring) or simply dipping into dressing on the side. However you apply salad dressing, the chances are, you use too much. Here's a neat low-fat option that might just help: By using a pump spray, Wish-Bone Salad Spritzers allow you control how much dressing you add to your salad. At one calorie per spritz or spray, and 10 calories—or 10 sprays—to dress one cup of salad, this seems an ideal way to add flavor to your salad with very little fat.

Of all the flavors, which include Caesar Delight, Asian Silk and Raspberry Bliss, the Balsamic Breeze is the best-tasting. The Italian dressing was a little sweet for my liking. All the varieties are somewhat watery, as you would expect, but they impart just enough flavor to your salad without overdoing it. Just remember to shake the bottle before you spray.


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Low Fat Halloween

Saturday, October 22, 2011
Halloween can be a nightmare if you want to limit the amount of fat and sugar you and your children eat. And while we all know that chocolate treats are high in fat, there are more innocuous-looking candies that have some fat in them, too. I thought I was safe sticking to a pack of Starburst, but no; even these fruity delights have a surprising amount of fat (palm kernel oil is the culprit). And don’t be fooled into thinking that eating a few chocolate kisses here and there, peppered with some fun-size chocolate bars in between, is anything less than a fat and sugar splurge. Fun-size treats can be a good way to exercise portion control, or a way to eat more than we should because they’re oh-so-small.

How to a Have a Fun Halloween Without all the Fat

Consider offering calorie-free treats. By calorie free, I mean fill your bowl with some of the following, which can be bought relatively inexpensively in bulk from party stores, and which are often discounted the week before October 31st (and, of course, the week after, should you want to shop for next year):
  • stickers
  • pencils
  • erasers
  • plastic Dracula teeth
  • mini Halloween-themed notebooks
  • plastic spider/skull/bat rings
  • mini play dough cans in Halloween colors
  • tattoos
  • glow-in-the-dark rubber eyeballs or mini skeletons
  • black and orange friendship bracelets
  • glow sticks
  • sugar-free gum (not calorie free, but a still a good option)

As much as my children love to fill their cauldrons with candy, they’re equally thrilled to find longer-lasting little goodies hidden in their stash. I’ve noticed that whenever I offer a bowl filled with non-candy treats, kids will often choose these over the candies.

Before heading out into the night, make sure everyone has eaten dinner and brushed their teeth. This way, you might have less room to eat much candy, and any pieces that are eaten are less likely to stick to the teeth.

On the subject of dinner, Halloween would be a good time to serve a crockpot meal, so that a healthy, nutritious dinner is ready and waiting while you attend to getting the kids ready for trick-or-treating.

In the interests of safety as much as anything else, make sure the kids don’t open their candies until they get home. Offer them a piece of sugar-free gum that you've supplied if they feel the need to have something to chew on.

Once home, sort through the stash, tossing any no-no’s—for us, jawbreakers, gum balls, and anything that might break my elder daughter’s orthodontic appliance. If you’re more concerned about fat than sugar, then take out the higher-fat candies—those with nuts, coconut, or caramel. Then, if you still have a mound of candy, toss a proportion of what’s left.

Allow your kids to select two or three small pieces of candy, then put the rest away, to be rationed out at agreed intervals over the next week or two, with a cut-off for tossing the leftovers. You could offer an incentive or a trade to sweeten the deal.

Be sure the leftovers are actually tossed, rather than reassigned to mom (or dad). It’s a big waste, but that’s better than a big waist.

Have a happy, healthy, and fun Halloween.


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Easy Low Fat Pumpkin Cake

Saturday, October 22, 2011

Pair this deliciously sweet, low fat pumpkin cake with a mug of steaming hot apple cider.

Ingredients:

  • 1 box of organic yellow cake mix
  • 2 tsp pumpkin pie mix
  • 1/2 cup egg substitute
  • 1/3 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 1 15-ounce can organic pumpkin
  • .
  • Frosting
  • 1/2 cup reduced-fat tub cream cheese
  • 2 1/2 cups confectioners' sugar, sifted
  • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Preparation:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Coat a 9 X 13 inch baking pan with nonstick cooking spray.

Place cake mix and pumpkin pie spice in a large bowl.

Add egg substitute, applesauce and canned pumpkin.

Beat by hand until smooth. Empty into baking pan and bake for 30-35 minutes, or until a toothpick placed in the center comes out clean.

Cool on wire rack.

For the frosting, place cream cheese, confectioners' sugar and vanilla in a large bowl. Beat on medium speed with an electric mixer until smooth. Spread frosting over cake.

Makes 24 small squares.

Per square: Calories 144, Calories from Fat 18, Total Fat 1.9g (sat 0.2g), Cholesterol 2mg, Sodium 142mg, Carbohydrate 29.5g, Fiber 0.8g, Protein 2.1g


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What Should Be Done About Sugar

Friday, October 21, 2011
sugarIt's really quite amazing how long it is taking people to come around to the idea that sugar is bad for us, but it is (glacially) happening.

Due to accumulating research that sugar could be a factor in heart disease (such as this recent study), the American Heart Association has been talking more about cutting back on sugar, and advises limiting added sugars to 6-9 teaspoons per day. (Weirdly, the American Diabetes Association calls the alarm about sugar "hype", at the same advising small portions -- the ADA has been giving out increasingly mixed messages about sugar and other carbs.)

Those of us who have experienced the benefits of giving up sugar and other high-carb foods don't need large organizations to tell us, but you don't have to look far to see that sugar is still Very Big Business.

What Should Be Done?

Other than bloggers and authors continuing to raise the alarm, what should be done about the pervasive problem of large amounts of sugar in our diets?

- One group is promoting Sugar Addiction Awareness Day on the day before Halloween, which I think it pretty cool. The question of whether sugar is truly addictive is controversial, but my readers sure *feel* as though it is, and I agree.

- Taxes are being increasingly brought up as a potentially helpful response. In a poll I posted last spring, my readers did not go for this option at all.

- Anti-sugar crusader Dr. Robert Lustig thinks that we should consider some kind of regulation, but isn't sure what exactly should be done. He's doing his part to educate people, though.

One thing is for sure: the message is not really getting out with the kind of impact that would make large numbers of people make a change. In the mainstream press and on TV news shows, I still hear much more about the evils of eating fat than the evils of eating sugar. And without getting the media on our side, the bloggers and the individual crusaders are not going to make a difference very quickly. But, we will soldier on! Drops of water on the stone...and finally the rock wears down.

Photo c Carlos Paes

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Glazed Pork Medallions

Monday, October 17, 2011

These lean pork medallions are tender and delicious, with a slightly sweet and tangy flavor. The great thing about pork tenderloin, from which these medallions are cut, is that it's almost as lean as white-meat chicken. Pork is also a richer-tasting meat, which in itself is very satisfying, and a nice change from everyday chicken breasts. The flavor combination in these glazed medallions makes them a kid-pleaser, too. It certainly did in our house!

Prep Time: 5?minutes

Cook Time: 12?minutes

Total Time: 17?minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 ? pounds pork tenderloin, trimmed
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • ? cup balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard

Preparation:

Cut pork tenderloin into one inch rounds. Heat oil in large skillet on medium heat.

Meanwhile preheat oven to 375 degrees, and spray a baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray.

Saute medallions one minute per side, then transfer to baking sheet.

Whisk vinegar, honey and mustard together in a small bowl. Generously brush medallions with glaze.

Cook in oven for 10 minutes.

Serves 4

Per Serving: Calories 205, Calories from Fat 69, Total Fat 7.1g (Sat 2.1g), Cholesterol 72mg, Sodium 155mg, Carbohydrate 10.3g, Fiber 0g, Protein 23.8g


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