Low-Carb Thanksgiving Blog Roundup

Wednesday, November 30, 2011
ThanksgivingIt's fun to see my Low-Carb Thanksgiving Ideas and Recipes attract attention at this time of year. But there are lots of other low-carb bloggers with great ideas for the holiday:
  • Dana Carpender gives us lots of ideas, recipes, and a Thanksgiving Pep Talk to help keep us on track!
  • DAR of DAR Dreams has a great idea for low-carb "stuffing for one" -- how to make your own bit of stuffing and keep it separate from the rest (but still in the turkey!)
  • Kalyn at Kalyn's Kitchen shares her Top Ten Favorite Thanksgiving Recipes (and ten honorable mentions, too!)
  • And Connie Bennett, on her Sugar Shock Blog, motivates us through the holidays with 150 Ways Sugar Ruins Your Health.
Photo c Lisa Peardon

More Low-Carb Thanksgiving Recipes:

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Nuts and Seeds

Wednesday, November 30, 2011
This table shows data for one ounce of the nuts and seeds listed, including the grams of total carbohydrate, fiber, net carb and the different types of fats. To calculate the total polyunsaturated fat, add the omega-3 and omega-6 figures together. Note that if the nuts or seeds are roasted in oil, there will be more oil and calories than is shown.

Tip: For best quality, store nuts and seeds in the refrigerator or freezer so the oils won't go rancid. Nuts and seeds with high levels of polyunsaturated fats (omega-3 fats and omega-6 fats) go rancid more easily, as do nuts and seeds which are broken, chopped, or ground into meal.

For more information about the each nutrient, see:

Source: USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21.

* Coconut - dried and unsweetened

Carbohydrates and Fats in Nuts and Seeds (1 Ounce)

CalTot. CarbFiberNet CarbSat. FatMono Fatω-3 Fatω-6 Fat
Almonds1616.13.42.718.60.23.4
Brazil Nuts1843.42.11.34.26.90.055.8
Cashews1559.20.98.12.26.70.22.2
Chestnuts6012.82.310.50.10.20.030.22
Chia Seeds13712.310.61.70.90.64.91.6
Coconut*1856.64.62160.800.2
Flax Seeds1508.17.6.512.16.31.7
Hazelnuts1764.72.721.312.80.242.2
Madadamia Nuts20142.41.63.416.50.06.36
Peanuts1594.52.42.11.96.804.4
Pecans1933.92.71.21.711.40.285.8
Pine Nuts1883.712.71.45.30.319.4
Pistachios1567.82.95.81.56.50.713.7
Pumpkin Seeds15151.13.92.440.515.8
Sesame Seeds1606.63.33.31.95.30.116
Sunflower Seeds1645.62.43.21.25.20.216.5
Walnuts1833.81.91.91.72.52.510.7

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Low-Carb Travel Tips

Wednesday, November 30, 2011
travelAre you getting ready to travel for Thanksgiving? If you are worried that you'll have trouble sticking to a low-carb way of eating while traveling, fear not! This Low-Carb Travel Guide will allow you to get to and from your loved ones without having to reach for the high-carb foods in airports and truck stops. And if you have trouble with your eating once you're with those loved ones, check out these tips for Eating with People who Eat Differently. And have a Happy Thanksgiving!

Photo c Tom Denham

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Thanksgiving Side Dishes

Wednesday, November 30, 2011
It's generally not the turkey or the ham that will derail your diet at Thanksgiving, it's usually the side dishes and desserts. Let's take a look at side dishes for now, as there's an awful lot of fat and calories in those mashed potatoes, gravy, casseroles, stuffings, gratins, and, of course, gravy. And the side dishes that aren't necessarily high in fat might have a lot of added sugar -- marshmallow-topped sweet potatoes, anyone? So here are 10 low-fat Thanksgiving side dishes that should help keep things in check. After all, Hanukkah and Christmas are just around the corner, and we'll be doing this all over again!

Low Fat Green Bean Casserole c Fiona Haynes, licensed to About.com


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Orange-Glazed Carrots

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

A quick and easy side dish for your Thanksgiving or Christmas table, or for any other holiday dinner.

Cook Time: 8 minutes

Total Time: 8 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound baby carrots
  • 1/2 cup orange juice
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 2 tbsp finely chopped fresh parsley

Preparation:

Cook carrots in a large skillet of boiling water until tender-crisp, about 5 minutes. Drain water. Add honey and orange juice and simmer until liquid is syrupy, about 3 or 4 more minutes. Sprinkle with fresh parsley.

Serves 6.

Per Serving: Calories 52, Calories from fat 4, Total Fat 0.4g (sat 0.1g), Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium 27mg, Carbohydrate 11.3g, Fiber 1.4g, Protein 0.7g


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Healthy Green Bean Casserole

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

I have trouble feeling satisfied with holiday dinner without the green bean casserole. However, I'm not a fan of the typical, processed ingredients. Here's a healthy version of green bean casserole that lacks none of the flavor, but does lack the fat and calories in the traditional recipe.

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 pounds fresh green beans, washed and trimmed
  • 1/2 cup crushed cornflakes
  • 1 Tbsp plus 1 tsp butter
  • 1 Tbsp flour
  • 1/2 cup non-fat milk
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 Tbsp low-fat plain yogurt
  • 1/2 cup shredded swiss cheese
  • 2 tsp dried minced onion
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp ground black pepper

Preparation:

1. Preheat he oven to 375°F.

2. Steam the green beans for 10 minutes, or until tender.

3. Meanwhile, melt 1 tsp of the butter in a microwave-safe bowl. Add the cornflakes, and toss to combine. Set aside.

4. In a small saucepan, melt 1 Tbsp of the butter. Add the flour, and cook, stirring constantly with a whisk, for 1 minute. Whisk in the milk, and continue cooking until slightly thickened. Remove from the heat, and add the yogurt, cheese, onion, salt, and pepper. Stir until cheese is melted.

5. Toss the cheese mixture together with the green beans, and pour into a 9x13-inch baking pan coated with cooking spray. Sprinkle the cornflake mixture on top of the casserole. Bake, uncovered for 20 minutes.

Per Serving Calories 78


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Last-Minute Thanksgiving Tips

Tuesday, November 29, 2011
Most families have a story about Thanksgiving gone awry, with undercooked turkeys, overcooked turkeys, still-frozen turkeys, and other oven mishaps. So here are some tips and suggestions to help, some from me and some from my fellow food guides here at About.com:

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Carb Counts for Kiwifruit

Tuesday, November 29, 2011
Kiwifruit (also called kiwi fruit, kiwi, and Chinese gooseberry) has a flavor which has been described as a cross between strawberries, melons, and bananas. In the summer in the Northern Hemisphere, California provides most of our kiwifruit, while New Zealand takes over the rest of the year.

Carbohydrate and Fiber Counts for Kiwifruit

  • 1 medium kiwifruit, without skin, a little less than 3 oz: 9 grams effective (net) carbohydrate plus 2 grams fiber and 46 calories.
  • 1 large kiwifruit, without skin, about 3? oz: 10 grams effective (net) carbohydrate plus 3 grams fiber and 56 calories.

Glycemic Index for Kiwifruit

The averages in studies of kiwifruit ranged between 47 and 58, with an average glycemic index of 53.

More Information about the Glycemic Index

Glycemic Load of Kiwifruit

More Information about the Glycemic Load

Health Benefits of Kiwifruit

Kiwifruit are an excellent source of vitamin C, as one large kiwifruit contains about as much vitamin C as 6 oz of orange juice. They are also a very good source of vitamin K, and a good source of potassium and copper. They also contain relatively large amounts of phytonutrients, which may help protect our cells from damage.

More Information About Kiwifruit at Calorie Count Plus.

Sources:

Collins BH, Horska A, Hotten PM, et al. Kiwifruit protects against oxidative DNA damage in human cells and in vitro. Nutrition and Cancer 39(1):148-53 (2001).

Leroux, MarcusFoster-Powell, Kaye, Holt, Susanna and Brand-Miller, Janette. "International table of glycemic index and glycemic load values: 2002." American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Vol. 76, No. 1, 5-56, (2002).

USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.


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Turkey and Vegetable Pie

Tuesday, November 29, 2011
One of my favorite ways to use leftover turkey is to makes this creamy and delicious turkey and vegetable pie. It's a perfect meal in one dish, as it's topped with mashed potatoes and comes loaded with vegetables. If you have leftover mashed potatoes from Thanksgiving, this is a great way to use those up, too. If not, it's not a big deal to prepare some.

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Sautéed Green Beans

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Low Calorie Sautéed Green BeansKimberley K. Eggleston

Use a non-stick pan for this recipe. That way, there are just enough bacon drippings to saute the onions without adding any additional fat to the dish.

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 slices turkey bacon
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion (1/2 of a medium)
  • 1 lb. fresh, trimmed green beans (about 3 cups)
  • Dash ground black pepper

Preparation:

2. Heat a large, non-stick skillet over medium-high heat and add bacon. Cook bacon about five minutes, or until crisp. Remove the bacon, crumble, and set aside.

2. Add the onions to the pan. Saute 4-5 minutes, or until translucent. Add the green beans, and saute 5-6 minutes, or until the green beans are crisp-tender. They should be fork-tender, but still maintain a slightly crisp bite.

3. Return the bacon to the pan, season with a dash of ground black pepper, and toss the green beans, onion, and bacon together.

Serves 6

Per Serving Calories 36


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How to Make Low-Carb Sauces and Gravy

Tuesday, November 29, 2011
gravyAt this time of year, I find myself needing to thicken gravies, sauces, and casseroles. If it's just a little thickener that's needed, I can use a bit of flour (rice flour in my case since I can't eat wheat). But if it's very much flour it will add too much starch. What to do? Check out How to Make Low-Carb Gravy and How to Thicken a Low-Carb Sauce.

Photo c Vanessa Pike-Russell

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Pumpkin Tart

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Be sure to spray your muffin tins well with cooking spray so that the pumpkin tarts are easily loosened after baking.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup graham cracker crumbs (about 9 graham crackers)
  • 3 Tbsp brown sugar
  • 5 Tbsp melted butter
  • 1/4 cup lowfat cottage cheese
  • 3 oz. regular cream cheese
  • 1/4 cup canned pumpkin
  • 3 Tbsp whole milk yogurt
  • 2 egg whites, beaten
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp cornstarch
  • 1/4 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/4 tsp pumpkin pie spice

Preparation:

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2. Combine the graham cracker crumbs, melted butter, and sugar in a mixing bowl. Mix until well-combined. Spray 12 mini-muffin tins with non-stick cooking spray. Press about 1 1/2 tablespoons of graham cracker mixture into each muffin compartment, assuring that the graham cracker mixture is pressed evenly along the bottom and up the sides.

3. Bake the graham cracker crusts for 5-6 minutes, until lightly browned. Allow to cool.

4. In a food processor or blender, combine the cottage cheese, cream cheese, yogurt, pumpkin and egg whites. Process until smooth. Add the sugar, cornstarch, vanilla, and pumpkin pie spice, and process until well-combined.

4. Pour the pumpkin mixture evenly into each of the tart shells.

5. Bake for 30 minutes at 350°F until a toothpick inserted in the center of a tart comes out clean. Allow to cool in pan, then carefully loosen tarts. Serve or refrigerate up to one day.

Makes 1 dozen

Per Serving (1 tart) Calories 130


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Why People Regain Weight

Monday, November 28, 2011
guy I've long been fascinated by how the body regulates weight. For 40 years I've been observing people lose and regain weight (including myself). I try to follow people who lose weight over time to see what happens. Almost invariably, they gain back at least part of it, often most of it, and very often all of it. Eating low-carb definitely makes a difference, -- people do generally keep off more weight than on other diets, but sadly it is not a magic bullet for everyone who wants to get to their dream weight.

To hear some people tell it, our weight is 100% under our conscious control, but it's long been crystal clear to me this this is simply not true. People who have been highly successful in many areas of their lives have been told that they lack willpower if they are overweight, and I do not believe it. For one thing, the role of hunger is very often ignored when it comes to weight control! It seems as though this is about as basic a connection as it's possible to make (hunger leads to eating; what a shock), but during discussions of weight regain the conclusion is always that "people go back to their old habits". Yeah, that old habit of eating when you are ravenous is a difficult one to shake, for sure!

One advance of the last 10 to 15 years is the discovery of many of the mechanisms that regulate hunger. Hormones and peptides, including leptin, ghrelin, cholecystokinin, peptide PYY, and many more, have been investigated. Research published in a recent issue of the New England Journal of Medicine (Long-Term Persistence of Hormonal Adaptations to Weight Loss), measured nine of these appetite-regulating substances that the body produces, as study participants lost ten percent of their body weight on a very low-calorie diet, and then maintained that loss for a year (not everyone who started out in the study was able to accomplish this, but they measured the people who did). What they found was that all nine chemicals they measured changed in response to the weight loss in the "hunger direction", and these changes persisted over the following year. Additionally, people reported feeling hungrier over this time, and that the same amount of food did not make them feel as satisfied by the end as it did before they lost the weight.

Happily for those of us who follow a low-carb way of eating, there is some evidence that our bodies respond less dramatically to a low-carb diet (which may be why people enjoy that wonderful lack of hunger during weight loss), but unhappily, we do not escape these effects altogether.

Another fairly dramatic change is that people's energy expenditure (calories used) went down with weight loss and stayed down (people were encouraged to do 30 minutes of moderate exercise per day, but were given no other instruction). Partly this was due to a down-regulation of basal metabolism. Also, when people aren't getting enough to eat, they simply stop moving as much. The body is orchestrating a complicated coordinated response to get us to stop losing weight after a certain point.

Is it a surprise to anyone that our bodies keep very close tabs on the food we ingest, and regulate it to a very fine degree? I think the reason that some folks are in shock over this is that eating feels voluntary, but the hungrier we are, the less control we have. Our bodies will even pull out the "emotional eating card" when we lose weight which encourages weight regain.

I also think that this partially explains why people who don't have a weight problem can't really understand those who do. They think about how when they've overeaten, they simply cut back. And we all do that, within a few pounds. But someone without a weight problem may assume that overweight people can't possibly be truly hungry. (If they would think about how they feel after they've lost some weight due to an illness, for example, and how hungry they are when their appetite returns, they might understand it better. Our bodies defend our weight just as vigorously.) One of the unanswered questions is how people who lose large amounts of weight and keep it off are different from those who regain. Partly it is probably simply the luck of the draw of individual variation, partly it may be getting a large amount of exercise (in the neighborhood of 60-90 minutes per day seems to help prevent weight regain), and partly it may be a certain level of obsessiveness. But I would guess it almost certainly involves cutting some carbs.

For me, one main moral of the story is to become happy with my body, and focus on health. A low-carb diet has reversed my body's progression to diabetes, normalized my blood pressure and blood lipids, halted my food cravings and obsessions, and improved my energy levels and ability to concentrate. I'll take it!!

Photo: CEF/Chris Newton/Getty Images

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Cranberry Sauce

Monday, November 28, 2011

Add a little zing to your holiday table and serve this spiced cranberry orange sauce. This can be made a few days ahead.

Cook Time: 12 minutes

Total Time: 12 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound fresh cranberries, rinsed and picked through
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • juice and zest of 1 large orange
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 4 cloves
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/4 cup light red wine (pinot noir is a good choice)

Preparation:

Combine ingredients in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until cranberries pop and sauce thickens. Remove from heat and let cool. Remove cinnamon, cloves and zest. Pour sauce into a bowl and chill. Serves 10.


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Winter Fruit Salad

Monday, November 28, 2011

This colorful fruit salad makes a beautiful addition to the holiday table. Serve as a light dessert or as a palate cleanser between courses.

Ingredients:

  • 2 Blood Oranges
  • 2 Navel Oranges
  • 1 Pink Grapefruit
  • 1 Yellow Grapefruit
  • 2 Star Fruit
  • 1 Pomegranate

Preparation:

Using a sharp knife, peel and segment oranges and grapefruit. Remove pith, pips and membranes. De-seed pomegranate and slice star fruit. Arrange citrus segments in a bowl with the star fruit and gently mix together. Sprinkle pomegranate seeds on top. Cover and chill until ready to serve. Serves 6

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Carbs in Kale

Monday, November 28, 2011
Kale is a member of the cabbage (Brasscica) family of vegetables. It is considered to be one of the most nutritious foods per calorie (see details below). Although it can be eaten raw, it is more commonly cooked. Kale can be steamed, sauteed, boiled, or even baked (when baked they turn crispy). There are many types of kale. Although most are green, there are also red and purple varieties.

Carbohydrate and Fiber Counts for Kale

  • 4 oz. (? pound) raw kale: 9 grams effective (net) carbohydrate plus 2.5 grams fiber and 56 calories
  • ? cup cooked kale: 2 grams effective (net) carbohydrate plus 2 grams fiber and 17 calories

Glycemic Index for Kale

As with most non-starchy vegetables, there is no scientific study of the glycemic index of kale.

More Information about the Glycemic Index

Estimated Glycemic Load of Kale

  • ? cup cooked kale: 2
  • 4 oz. (? pound) raw kale: 4

More Information About the Glycemic Load

Health Benefits of Kale

Leafy greens like kale are simply packed with nutritional goodness. Kale is an excellent source of fiber, vitamin K (1 cup of chopped raw kale has 8 times the daily requirement!), vitamin A (the same cup of kale has 3 times the daily requirement), beta-carotene and other carotenoids, lutein, zeaxanthin, and vitamin C. It is a very good source of manganese, and a good source of vitamin B6, potassium calcium, and copper. In addition, kale is one of the cruciferous vegetables, which have been shown to have anti-cancer properties.

More Information on the Health Benefits of kale and other Leafy Greens

Low-Carb Recipes with Kale

More Information About Kale at Calorie Count.

Sources:

Leroux, MarcusFoster-Powell, Kaye, Holt, Susanna and Brand-Miller, Janette. "International table of glycemic index and glycemic load values: 2002." American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Vol. 76, No. 1, 5-56, (2002).

USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21.


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Pizza and Fries Back on the School Lunch Menu

Monday, November 28, 2011
schoolBack in January, I wrote about the new proposed U.S. school lunch guidelines. Although they continue the same starch-based fat-phobic approach to nutrition of recent decades (you know, the one which has led to such great health improvements, especially in the areas of obesity and diabetes), there were some positives: encouraging a greater variety of vegetables, limiting potatoes and other starchy vegetables, and raising the amount of tomato paste that was needed to qualify as a serving of vegetables. As predicted, the USDA did make these the final proposal to Congress. But Congress did not agree.

This week, apparently under pressure from large food companies currently profiting from selling frozen pizza and french fries to school districts, Congress decided that They Did Not Approve. Limits on potatoes and other starchy vegetables were lifted, and the amount of tomato sauce which qualifies as a vegetable is kept low enough (2 tablespoons) that a slice of pizza can comfortably accomodate it. The argument was that children will eat pizza and fries but they would not eat other vegetables.

Apparently the idea of only serving 1% or fat-free milk, however, has support (at least I could not find anything to the contrary). So much for whole foods.

Photo: Tim Jones/Getty Images

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Cider-Glazed Brussels Sprouts

Sunday, November 6, 2011

These Cider-Glazed Brussels Sprouts are tender yet still have a bite to them, which is a far cry from the Brussels Sprouts I remember as a child, which were almost always overcooked and mushy. Serve these Cider-Glazed Brussels Sprouts as a side dish at Thanksgiving or Christmas.

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 12 minutes

Total Time: 22 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 pounds Brussels Sprouts, trimmed and with an x cut on the bottom
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, sliced thinly
  • 1 small red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup apple cider
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Preparation:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil and cook trimmed Brussels Sprouts for 6-8 minutes, until crisp-tender. Drain water.

In a large skillet, heat oil on medium and saute garlic and red onion. Add Brussels Sprouts and apple cider. Cook on high until cider is reduced and Brussels sprouts are tender.

Serves 6

Per Serving: Calories 100, Calories from Fat 23, Total Fat 2.6g (sat 0.4g), Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium 30mg, Carbohydrate 15.1g, Fiber 4.8g, Protein 4.1g


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Quick Mexican Dinner

Saturday, November 5, 2011

guacamole

For a quick mexican dinner, I mix up a recipe of this quick taco seaoning mix and add it to extra lean ground beef for tacos. I top them with lots of lettuce, tomato, and onions, and serve with a side of this tasty guacamole. It is dinner in a snap!

Photo@ Kimberley K. Eggleston, licensed to About.com, Inc


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Healthy Pumpkin Smoothie

Saturday, November 5, 2011

If you love pumpkin pie or pumpkin ice cream, then you'll love this healthy pumpkin smoothie, which is a bit like chilled pumpkin pie in a glass, but without the fat and calories. This thick and creamy smoothie makes a delicious and filling liquid breakfast or an energy-boosting snack. For a thick and frothy smoothie, be sure to use a very ripe banana, preferably frozen, and sweeten your smoothie according to your preference.

Pumpkin Smoothie c Fiona Haynes, licensed to About.com


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The Low Fat Salad

Saturday, November 5, 2011

Building a Healthy Low Fat Salad:

  • Vary your salad leaves. Iceberg lettuce is, well, crunchy and watery, and that’s about it. Boost your intake of vitamins and minerals with dark-leaf greens. Try peppery arugula or watercress, romaine leaves, baby spinach, mixed spring greens, red-leaf lettuce, mache, radicchio and endive.
  • Add beans—black beans, garbanzo beans, kidney beans, pinto beans, white beans and edamame.
  • In pasta or rice salads, use whole grains to boost your intake of fiber.
  • Try grains such as quinoa, bulgur wheat and couscous(a kind of pasta/grain crossover).
  • If you like meat in your salad, choose lean cuts of low sodium deli meats, and grilled or roast chicken and turkey. Use lean Canadian bacon instead of regular bacon.
  • Substitute water-based chunk light tuna (the pouch variety is firm and meaty) or salmon for meat, boosting your intake of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids.
  • Use reduced fat cheeses, cottage cheese or even fat-free shredded cheese. Or try strong-flavored cheeses like Gorgonzola or Parmesan, which pack a lot of flavor in small quantities.
  • Use a variety of vegetables—shredded cabbage, carrots, zucchini, broccoli or cauliflower florets, tomatoes, celery, asparagus, green beans, red onion, scallions, artichokes, sweet peppers, sliced mushrooms, jicama, cucumber, beets, fennel and eggplant.
  • Add fruit—grapes, mandarin oranges, mango, strawberries, blueberries, pear, apples, plums, peaches, nectarines, cantaloupe, watermelon, blackberries. Don’t forget dried fruits such as raisins, cranberries, apricots and cherries.
  • If you want eggs in your salad, remove the yolks, or at least half of them.
  • Include avocado from time to time. Although it's relatively high in fat (though mostly monounsaturated fat), it’s also packed with nutrients such as magnesium, potassium and vitamin E
  • Use nuts occasionally and sparingly. Almonds and walnuts contain heart-healthy fats and add a pleasing crunch and texture to salads
  • Make your own croutons using day-old bread sprinkled with dried herbs and baked on a cookie sheet coated with olive oil cooking spray
  • .
  • Make your own dressings, especially if you dislike most of the fat-free or low fat bottled varieties. If you have some plain non-fat yogurt, fat free mayonnaise or fat-free sour cream, you have a base for a creamy dressing. Low fat buttermilk is perfect, too. Just add your own herbs, spices and flavorings.
  • For vinaigrette dressings, the usual ratio of oil to vinegar is three to one. At the very least, reverse it so you have three parts vinegar to one part oil. Or simply replace some of the oil with water, juice or fat-free broth. Use honey, mustard, garlic, herbs, shallots, ginger or other flavors to add taste and body. If it’s fruitiness you’re after, use a little pureed fruit (raspberries or mango, for instance).

More Low Fat Salad Tips

If speed and convenience are important, buy bagged salad leaves and pre-cut or shredded vegetables. If you choose salad at a restaurant, ask for dressing on the side so you can at least control how much you use. Ask if any reduced fat dressings are available. Some restaurants have them. Choose a basic vinaigrette dressing over a creamy one. And if you opt for salad next time you drive through your local fast-food joint, choose grilled chicken over crispy chicken, and use up to half of the salad dressing pouch. Leave the croutons or crispy noodles pack unopened.

Here are some ideas for some delicious low fat salads.


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Healthy Halloween Foods

Saturday, November 5, 2011
It might not be realistic to expect our kids to pass up free candy, but we can keep things healthy at home by providing them with healthy treats and snacks before they head out to go trick or treating. Plus, if hungry tummies are filled with healthy food, there's less room for all that candy. In our house, much of the thrill in any case seems to be in the collecting of candy, and sorting through the stash later in the evening. With a little imagination, you can pass off ordinary foods as something spooky...
  • Tomato soup (pictured) can be blood soup; and black bean soup can be bat soup
  • Raw veggies can be arranged as spooky fingers or as skeletons
  • Whole grain spaghetti and red sauce can be passed off as blood and guts.
  • Cut Jack O' Lantern faces in quesadillas, but use whole grain tortillas and reduced-fat cheese, or make them with pieces of vegetables on whole-grain muffin pizzas
  • Make hot dog mummies, but using nitrite-free turkey hot dogs and reduced-fat crescent roll dough
  • Offer a fresh fruit cup in a hollowed out orange carved like a Jack O' Lantern
As for the candy, encourage everyone to select a few favorite fun-size pieces to enjoy over a few days, then ditch the rest, or find a local dentist who's prepared to trade it for a little money or a small prize.

"Blood Soup" photo c Fiona Haynes, licensed to About.com


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Dukan Diet Review

Saturday, November 5, 2011

These are the basics that Dr. Pierre Dukan advises in the four phases of his diet. For more information about the diet and my opinion of it, check out page one of this article.

All Phases:

It is "absolutely essential to drink 1 1/2 quarts of water per day." Mineral waters (except San Pellegrino, which has sodium) are especially favored, but almost any liquid counts. No alcohol until the final phase. Keep salt to a minimum. Exercise every day.

1. Attack Phase - two to seven days, usually five days. This phase is "pure protein," which means almost completely lean protein foods -- lean meats, fat-free dairy foods, eggs, tofu and seitan (pure wheat gluten). Allowed meats are lean cuts of beef, veal and pork, skinless chicken, turkey and fish. Also, 1 1/2 tablespoons of oat bran are required each day (Dukan has a recipe for an oat bran gallette that he recommends.) Twenty minutes of exercise, generally walking, is required each day.

2. Cruise Phase - Alternates pure protein days with days where non-starchy vegetables are added. The dieter can choose any pattern of equal numbers of days up to five. Dr. Dukan says that although five days of pure protein and five days including vegetables promote the fastest weight loss, he finds that a 1/1 pattern is the one people are most likely to stick with. Oat bran is increased to two tablespoons per day, and exercise to 30 minutes. The Cruise Phase continues until "true weight" is reached (a calculator for this is on the Dukan Diet Web site). For people who are quite overweight or obese, this weight is most likely higher than what would be considered a "normal" body mass index (BMI), but is considered a sustainable weight for that person. Dr. Dukan says that going below this weight before going on to the next phase "is not just an error, it is a huge mistake," as weight regain becomes far more likely.

3. Consolidation Phase - Some carbs are added to the diet at this phase, which is usually considerably longer than the cruise phase. It is five days for each pound lost, so if 24 pounds were lost, the consolidation phase would be four months long. The theory is that this is an unstable period where the body is likely to rebound and weight regain is likely to happen if care is not taken. There is still one pure protein day per week on the same day (Thursdays recommended), but on other days the protein, vegetables and one serving of fruit (but not bananas, grapes, cherries or dried fruit), two slices of 100% whole wheat bread and one serving of cheese. Also each week there is one serving of starchy foods such as potatoes or rice, one or two servings per week of lamb, roast pork or ham, and one "celebration meal" where you can have servings of whatever you want (but not seconds). During the second half of the phase, this increases to two starchy food servings and two celebration meals (but not two in a row).

4. Permanent Stabilization Phase - This is the "rest of your life phase." For most people, there are three rules to follow: pure protein every Thursday, three tablespoons of oat bran per day and no elevators or escalators (exceptions for more than five floors). (This last one is odd to me. Personally, the only time I encounter escalators or elevators is when I travel - airports and the occasional hotel. This is one of the Big Three??)

If you are especially prone to weight regain, Dr. Dukan has other suggestions, such as sucking on ice cubes, chewing your food slowly and completely, and exercising more. I consider these to vary between totally common sense and quite goofy. A lot of the idea is to use up small bits of calories here and there. I do not believe that burning more calories by sucking on ice cubes will make one bit of difference in the amount of fat in a person's body in the long run.

Interested in the book? Compare Prices

Related Resource: Low-Fat Low Carb Cooking

Sources:

Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids (Macronutrients) (2005), Food and Nutrition Board, National Academy of Sciences.

Leroux, MarcusFoster-Powell, Kaye, Holt, Susanna and Brand-Miller, Janette. "International table of glycemic index and glycemic load values: 2002." American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Vol. 76, No. 1, 5-56, (2002).


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Healthy Green Bean Casserole

Saturday, November 5, 2011

I have trouble feeling satisfied with holiday dinner without the green bean casserole. However, I'm not a fan of the typical, processed ingredients. Here's a healthy version of green bean casserole that lacks none of the flavor, but does lack the fat and calories in the traditional recipe.

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 pounds fresh green beans, washed and trimmed
  • 1/2 cup crushed cornflakes
  • 1 Tbsp plus 1 tsp butter
  • 1 Tbsp flour
  • 1/2 cup non-fat milk
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 Tbsp low-fat plain yogurt
  • 1/2 cup shredded swiss cheese
  • 2 tsp dried minced onion
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp ground black pepper

Preparation:

1. Preheat he oven to 375°F.

2. Steam the green beans for 10 minutes, or until tender.

3. Meanwhile, melt 1 tsp of the butter in a microwave-safe bowl. Add the cornflakes, and toss to combine. Set aside.

4. In a small saucepan, melt 1 Tbsp of the butter. Add the flour, and cook, stirring constantly with a whisk, for 1 minute. Whisk in the milk, and continue cooking until slightly thickened. Remove from the heat, and add the yogurt, cheese, onion, salt, and pepper. Stir until cheese is melted.

5. Toss the cheese mixture together with the green beans, and pour into a 9x13-inch baking pan coated with cooking spray. Sprinkle the cornflake mixture on top of the casserole. Bake, uncovered for 20 minutes.

Per Serving Calories 78


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Diabetes and Low-Carb Diets

Friday, November 4, 2011
Update January 2008: In the new guidelines, the ADA approved low-carb diets for weight loss, but not blood glucose control.

Diabetes is s disorder of carbohydrate metabolism. This means that the body is not able to use sugars effectively, and glucose builds up in the blood. These high levels of blood glucose cause many of the complications we associate with diabetes.

It might be logical to assume that reducing carbohydrate in the diet would be helpful in a disorder where the body has trouble processing it. Indeed, many people with diabetes find that this is the case, and some doctors are having great success using low carbohydrate diets to treat diabetes. However, the standard recommendations for diabetics include a diet that is relatively high in carbohydrate. Although clearly these recommendations help some, many people with diabetes and prediabetes find that (sometimes from the beginning and sometimes after a year or two) a low-carb diet is the only dietary routine that enables them achieve stable blood glucose. They become confused, if not bewildered, to find that their physicians and dietitians would prefer that they take more medication rather than reduce carbohydrate.

Potential Changes in ADA Recommendations

Up to this point, the American Diabetes Association, while admitting that "the best mix of carbohydrate, protein, and fat appears to vary depending on individual circumstances," has been reluctant to recommend significant carbohydrate restriction for a number of reasons. These include concerns that the diet is too difficult to follow, and that increasing fat and protein in the diet may cause health problems. However, there is mounting evidence that a low-carbohydrate diet can be helpful to Type 2 diabetics in a variety of ways, including weight loss, reduction of blood glucose, an often dramatic decrease in triglycerides, and other health benefits. Additionally, longer-term studies are so far not showing the ill effects that were feared.

Each year in January, the ADA publishes new dietary and other treatment guidelines for diabetes, intended to reflect advances in the scientific understanding of how best to treat diabetes. Although the final wording of the 2008 document has not been fully decided upon, Dr. Judith Wylie-Rosett, co-chair of the writing panel for the ADA's 2007 Nutrition Recommendations, has indicated that, "there is growing recognition that a variety of diets including low carbohydrate diets, can achieve weight loss. The importance of controlling carbohydrate intake to improve postprandial blood glucose is also recognized." Although Dr. Wylie-Rosett is understandably hesitant to guess at the ADA's exact final wording for the 2008 update, she does think that it will reflect the growing indications that low-carbohydrate diets can be helpful to some diabetics.

This potential change is consistent with ADA guidelines and goals which have stressed finding a diet that works for each individual for weight control and blood glucose control. At a May 2007 conference of The American Society of Bariatric Physicians, Dr. Wylie-Rosett spoke of low-carb diets as an "off label use" of diet for diabetes -- in other words, although the ADA was not endorsing them, if a low-carb diet was achieving the goals set by the ADA, it was within the bounds of the guidelines.

Goals of Dietary Recommendations for Diabetes

According to the 2007 position statement of the American Diabetes Association, the primary goals of medical nutrition therapy for diabetes are:
  1. Normal blood glucose, blood lipids (cholesterol and triglycerides), and blood pressure -- or as close as possible to these.
  2. Prevention of complications associated with diabetes
  3. "To address individual nutrition needs," according to such factors as motivation and cultural preferences.
  4. "To maintain the pleasure of eating by only limiting food choices when indicated by scientific evidence."
Note that a low-carb diet can potentially address the first three goals very well. In study after study, people have improved blood glucose, blood lipids, and blood pressure by reducing carbohydrate in their diets. Since blood glucose control is the most important element in preventing complications of diabetes, the second goal is addressed. Motivation is vital when it comes to controlling blood glucose by diet, but many people have proved that eating a low-carbohydrate diet in a healthy way can be achieved and sustained.

I applaud a greater range of dietary advice being available to health care professionals working to help people with diabetes find a diet which best serves them and leads to greater health. We in the low-carb community will anxiously await the opportunity to read the final version of the new ADA guidelines in the January 2008 issue of the journal Diabetes Care.

Sources

American Diabetes Association. "Nutrition Recommendations and Interventions for Diabetes." Diabetes Care. 30:S48-S65 (2007)

Nielsen, Jorgen, Joensson, Eva. "Low-carbohydrate diet in type 2 diabetes. Stable improvement of bodyweight and glycemic control during 22 months follow-up." Nutrition and Metabolism. 06/14/2007

Stern, Linda, et al. "The Effects of Low-Carbohydrate versus Conventional Weight Loss Diets in Severely Obese Adults: One-Year Follow-up of a Randomized Trial." Annals of Internal Medicine. 140/10 (2004)

Wylie-Rosett, J., Albright, AA, et al. "2006-2007 American Diabetes Association Nutrition Recommendations: issues for practice translation.." Journal of the American Dietetic Association. Aug;107(8):1296-304.(2007)

Wylie-Rosett, Judith. Conference Presentation, "A Review of the American Diabetes Association Recommendations for Dietary Carbohydrates" at the Eastern Regional Obesity Course of the American Society of Bariatric Physicians; Nutrition and Metabolism Workshop. May 5, 2007

Wylie-Rosett, Judith. Personal Communications. November 2007


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Carbs in Halloween Candy

Friday, November 4, 2011
How much sugar is in that fun-sized Snickers bar? How many calories in that tiny pack of M&M's? Whereas full-sized packages of candy have the nutritional information on the package, the deluge that comes home from trick or treating usually does not. Here is the calorie and carbohydrate information in many common Halloween candy treats.

I found that serving sizes can be tricky, especially with "off-brands." For example, a Palmer Halloween pack of peanut butter cups lists a serving size as 1.5 ounces. How many PB cups a serving? Well, there are 63 pieces of candy in the 26 oz bag, and we are left to figure it out from there. A serving turns out to be 3.64 pieces of candy! Pretty ridiculous.

Also, "fun size" and "snack size" are often on the packaging, but these sizes don't really mean anything. A snack size of one type of candy can be the same as a fun size of another. Even worse, I found instances where "snack size" of the same type of candy differed from one bag to another, and it certainly changes over time (they are gradually getting smaller). This is why I put the weight of the candy on the list as well.

Chocolate Bars and Kisses (Mostly Chocolate)

Dove Milk Chocolate Promises or wrapped squares (8 g) - 42 calories and 6 g carb

Hershey Kisses - 26 calories and 8 g carb each kiss

Hershey Kisses with Almonds - 23 calories and 2 g carb each kiss

Hershey Kisses filled with Caramel - 21 calories and 3 g carb each kiss

Hershey Candy Corn Kisses - 27 calories and 3 g carb each kiss

Hershey's Milk Chocolate Bars - Fun size (14 g) - 67 calories and 8 g carb

Hershey's Miniature Bars (mixed) - average of 42 calories and 5 g carb each bar

M&Ms, plain, Fun size (18 g) - 88 calories and 12 g carb

M&Ms, peanut

  • Fun size (18 g) - 93 calories and 11 g carb
  • 1/4 cup candy - 220 calories and 24 g carb
Miniature Bars (Milky Way, Snickers, Twix, 3 Muskateers) - average 38 calories and 5 g carb each bar

Mr. Goodbar Snack size (17 g) - 90 calories and 9 grams carb

Nestle's Crunch Bars Fun size (10 g) 50 calories and 7 grams carb

Nestle's Crunch Caramel Bars - Fun size - 70 calories and 9 g carb

Palmer Peanut Butter cups, small - 6 g carb

Three Muskateers bar

  • Fun size (15 g) - 64 calories and 11 g carb
  • Mint, Fun size (15g) - 64 calories and 11 g carb
Tootsie Rolls
  • Small bar - 50 calories and 10 g carb
  • Midgee - 23 calories and 7 g carb
  • Mini-Midgees - 11 calories and 2 g carb

Peanut and Peanut Butter Candies

Pay Day - Snack size (19 g) - 90 calories and 10 g carb

Reese's Peanut Butter Cups

  • Miniature (about 9 grams each) - 44 calories and 5 g carb per cup
  • Snack size (17 g) - 88 calories and 10 g carb
  • Snack size (21 g) - 100 calories and 12 g carb
  • White, Snack size (21 g) - 100 calories and 11 g carb
Reese's Peanut Butter Pumpkins (34 g) - 180 calories and 17 g carb

Reese's Crispy Crunchy Bar, Snack size (17 g) - 95 calories and 9 g carb

Reese's Nutrageous Bars, Snack size (17 g) - 88 calories and 9 g carb

Reese's Whipps Bar, Snack size (14 g) - 60 calories and 10 g carb

Mixed Candy Bars

100 Grand Bars
  • Fun size (11 g) - 50 calories and 8 g carb
  • Fun size (21 g) - 95 calories and 15 g carb
Almond Joy Snack size (15 g) - 80 calories and 10g carb

Baby Ruth Bar, Fun size (18 g each) - 85 calories and 13 g carb

Butterfinger Bar, Fun size (18 g each) - 85 calories 14 g carb

Butterfinger Crisp Bar, Snack size (20 g) - 100 calories and 13 g carb

Heath Bar, Snack size (13 g) - 74 calories and 9 g carb

Kit Kat, Fun size (14 g) - 73 calories and 9 g carb

Milky Way bar, Fun size (17 g) - 75 calories and 12 g carb

Mounds bars, Snack size (17 g) - 83 calories and 9 g carb

Rocky Road, Snack size (10 g) - 45 calories and 6 g carb

Snickers Bars, Fun size (17 g) - 80 calories and 10 g carb

Snickers Almond Bars, Fun size (17 g) - 80 calories and 11 g carb

Snickers Creme Pumpkin (1 oz) - 150 calories and 16 g carb

Take Five bar, Fun size (15 g) - 10 g carb

Twix, Snack size (10 g) - 50 calories and 7 g carb

Taffy and Caramel

AbbaZabba, small (12 g) 50 calories and 11 g carb

Charleston Chew bar, Fun size (10 g) - 45 calories and 8 g carb

Laffy Taffy, Chocolate, small bars (8 g each) - 32 calories and 7 g carb

Milk Duds Snack size (12 g) - 54 calories and 9 g carb

Milk Maid Caramels, Brach's - 40 calories and 10 g carb per piece

Fruity and Gummy Candies

Jujyfruits - 9 pieces - 60 calories and 16 g carb

Lifesavers Gummies (2 rolls per ounce) - 52 calories and 13 g carb per roll

Mini Dots (2 small boxes per ounce) 70 calories and 17 g carb per box

Skittles

  • Original Fruit, Fun size (20 g) - 80 calories and 18 g carb
  • Chocolate Assortment, Fun size (20 g) - 80 calories and 18 g carb
Starburst, Fun size (2 pieces per stick) - 40 calories and 10 g carb

Twizzlers

  • Mini-bars (14 g) - 11 g carb
  • Strawberry Twists, Short (9 g) - 32 calories and 7 g carb
  • Cherry Pull-N-Peel (12 g) - 40 calories and 9 g carb

Hard Candies and Pops

Blow Pop, Junior - 50 calories and 14 g carb

Jolly Rancher

  • Hard Candy (6 g) - 23 calories and 6 g carb
  • Lollipops (17 g) - 60 calories and 16 g carb
  • Hard Candy Sticks, Small (11g) - 43 calories and 10 g carb
  • Double Blasts (4 g) - 13 calories and 3 g carb
Tootsie Pops - 60 calories and 15 g carb

Tootsie Caramel Apple Pops - 60 calories and 15 g carb

Wonka Nerds - small box (13 g) - 50 calories and 12 g carb

Other Candies

Candy Corn, Brach's - 11 pieces - 70 calories and 18 g carb

Hot Tamales - small pkg (14 g) - 50 calories and 12 g carb

Jr. Mints, Fun size (10 g) - 50 calories and 12 g carb

Mike and Ike small box (14 g) - 50 calories and 12 g carb

Pop Rocks - small packet (10 g) - 7 g carb

Raisinettes, Fun size (16 g - about 16 pieces) - 56 calories and 11 g carb

Smarties Candy, Roll - 25 calories and 6 g carb

Whoppers

  • 1 small tube - 30 calories and 5 g carb
  • 1 small pouch (21 g) - 100 calories and 16 g carb
York Peppermint Patties
  • Regular small patty (14 g) - 53 calories and 11 g carb
  • Pink Peppermint Patties, small (14 g) - 53 calories and 11 g carb
  • Peppermint Patty Pumpkins (14 g) - 50 calories and 11 g carb

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Carbs in Halloween Candy

Friday, November 4, 2011
How much sugar is in that fun-sized Snickers bar? How many calories in that tiny pack of M&M's? Whereas full-sized packages of candy have the nutritional information on the package, the deluge that comes home from trick or treating usually does not. Here is the calorie and carbohydrate information in many common Halloween candy treats.

I found that serving sizes can be tricky, especially with "off-brands." For example, a Palmer Halloween pack of peanut butter cups lists a serving size as 1.5 ounces. How many PB cups a serving? Well, there are 63 pieces of candy in the 26 oz bag, and we are left to figure it out from there. A serving turns out to be 3.64 pieces of candy! Pretty ridiculous.

Also, "fun size" and "snack size" are often on the packaging, but these sizes don't really mean anything. A snack size of one type of candy can be the same as a fun size of another. Even worse, I found instances where "snack size" of the same type of candy differed from one bag to another, and it certainly changes over time (they are gradually getting smaller). This is why I put the weight of the candy on the list as well.

Chocolate Bars and Kisses (Mostly Chocolate)

Dove Milk Chocolate Promises or wrapped squares (8 g) - 42 calories and 6 g carb

Hershey Kisses - 26 calories and 8 g carb each kiss

Hershey Kisses with Almonds - 23 calories and 2 g carb each kiss

Hershey Kisses filled with Caramel - 21 calories and 3 g carb each kiss

Hershey Candy Corn Kisses - 27 calories and 3 g carb each kiss

Hershey's Milk Chocolate Bars - Fun size (14 g) - 67 calories and 8 g carb

Hershey's Miniature Bars (mixed) - average of 42 calories and 5 g carb each bar

M&Ms, plain, Fun size (18 g) - 88 calories and 12 g carb

M&Ms, peanut

  • Fun size (18 g) - 93 calories and 11 g carb
  • 1/4 cup candy - 220 calories and 24 g carb
Miniature Bars (Milky Way, Snickers, Twix, 3 Muskateers) - average 38 calories and 5 g carb each bar

Mr. Goodbar Snack size (17 g) - 90 calories and 9 grams carb

Nestle's Crunch Bars Fun size (10 g) 50 calories and 7 grams carb

Nestle's Crunch Caramel Bars - Fun size - 70 calories and 9 g carb

Palmer Peanut Butter cups, small - 6 g carb

Three Muskateers bar

  • Fun size (15 g) - 64 calories and 11 g carb
  • Mint, Fun size (15g) - 64 calories and 11 g carb
Tootsie Rolls
  • Small bar - 50 calories and 10 g carb
  • Midgee - 23 calories and 7 g carb
  • Mini-Midgees - 11 calories and 2 g carb

Peanut and Peanut Butter Candies

Pay Day - Snack size (19 g) - 90 calories and 10 g carb

Reese's Peanut Butter Cups

  • Miniature (about 9 grams each) - 44 calories and 5 g carb per cup
  • Snack size (17 g) - 88 calories and 10 g carb
  • Snack size (21 g) - 100 calories and 12 g carb
  • White, Snack size (21 g) - 100 calories and 11 g carb
Reese's Peanut Butter Pumpkins (34 g) - 180 calories and 17 g carb

Reese's Crispy Crunchy Bar, Snack size (17 g) - 95 calories and 9 g carb

Reese's Nutrageous Bars, Snack size (17 g) - 88 calories and 9 g carb

Reese's Whipps Bar, Snack size (14 g) - 60 calories and 10 g carb

Mixed Candy Bars

100 Grand Bars
  • Fun size (11 g) - 50 calories and 8 g carb
  • Fun size (21 g) - 95 calories and 15 g carb
Almond Joy Snack size (15 g) - 80 calories and 10g carb

Baby Ruth Bar, Fun size (18 g each) - 85 calories and 13 g carb

Butterfinger Bar, Fun size (18 g each) - 85 calories 14 g carb

Butterfinger Crisp Bar, Snack size (20 g) - 100 calories and 13 g carb

Heath Bar, Snack size (13 g) - 74 calories and 9 g carb

Kit Kat, Fun size (14 g) - 73 calories and 9 g carb

Milky Way bar, Fun size (17 g) - 75 calories and 12 g carb

Mounds bars, Snack size (17 g) - 83 calories and 9 g carb

Rocky Road, Snack size (10 g) - 45 calories and 6 g carb

Snickers Bars, Fun size (17 g) - 80 calories and 10 g carb

Snickers Almond Bars, Fun size (17 g) - 80 calories and 11 g carb

Snickers Creme Pumpkin (1 oz) - 150 calories and 16 g carb

Take Five bar, Fun size (15 g) - 10 g carb

Twix, Snack size (10 g) - 50 calories and 7 g carb

Taffy and Caramel

AbbaZabba, small (12 g) 50 calories and 11 g carb

Charleston Chew bar, Fun size (10 g) - 45 calories and 8 g carb

Laffy Taffy, Chocolate, small bars (8 g each) - 32 calories and 7 g carb

Milk Duds Snack size (12 g) - 54 calories and 9 g carb

Milk Maid Caramels, Brach's - 40 calories and 10 g carb per piece

Fruity and Gummy Candies

Jujyfruits - 9 pieces - 60 calories and 16 g carb

Lifesavers Gummies (2 rolls per ounce) - 52 calories and 13 g carb per roll

Mini Dots (2 small boxes per ounce) 70 calories and 17 g carb per box

Skittles

  • Original Fruit, Fun size (20 g) - 80 calories and 18 g carb
  • Chocolate Assortment, Fun size (20 g) - 80 calories and 18 g carb
Starburst, Fun size (2 pieces per stick) - 40 calories and 10 g carb

Twizzlers

  • Mini-bars (14 g) - 11 g carb
  • Strawberry Twists, Short (9 g) - 32 calories and 7 g carb
  • Cherry Pull-N-Peel (12 g) - 40 calories and 9 g carb

Hard Candies and Pops

Blow Pop, Junior - 50 calories and 14 g carb

Jolly Rancher

  • Hard Candy (6 g) - 23 calories and 6 g carb
  • Lollipops (17 g) - 60 calories and 16 g carb
  • Hard Candy Sticks, Small (11g) - 43 calories and 10 g carb
  • Double Blasts (4 g) - 13 calories and 3 g carb
Tootsie Pops - 60 calories and 15 g carb

Tootsie Caramel Apple Pops - 60 calories and 15 g carb

Wonka Nerds - small box (13 g) - 50 calories and 12 g carb

Other Candies

Candy Corn, Brach's - 11 pieces - 70 calories and 18 g carb

Hot Tamales - small pkg (14 g) - 50 calories and 12 g carb

Jr. Mints, Fun size (10 g) - 50 calories and 12 g carb

Mike and Ike small box (14 g) - 50 calories and 12 g carb

Pop Rocks - small packet (10 g) - 7 g carb

Raisinettes, Fun size (16 g - about 16 pieces) - 56 calories and 11 g carb

Smarties Candy, Roll - 25 calories and 6 g carb

Whoppers

  • 1 small tube - 30 calories and 5 g carb
  • 1 small pouch (21 g) - 100 calories and 16 g carb
York Peppermint Patties
  • Regular small patty (14 g) - 53 calories and 11 g carb
  • Pink Peppermint Patties, small (14 g) - 53 calories and 11 g carb
  • Peppermint Patty Pumpkins (14 g) - 50 calories and 11 g carb

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Low Calorie Lunch

Friday, November 4, 2011

A good low calorie lunch is not only low in calories, but is filling, healthy, and tasty. This can be a challenge, especially when you are on the go. Here are 5 low calorie lunch ideas, complete with side dishes and recipes, that are easy to take with you. ?

1. Salmon Salad with Whole Wheat Rolls

Kimberley K. Eggleston

This low calorie lunch is complete with creamy salmon salad atop a bed of greens, and a whole wheat dinner roll on the side. Bake the rolls early in the week, and store them in the freezer. Then all you have to do is grab one on your way out the door, and place in a plastic baggie. It will be ready by the time lunch rolls around.

Low Calorie Salmon Salad

Whole Wheat Dinner Rolls

2. Hummus with Garlic Pita Chips and Assorted Vegetables

Kimberley K. Eggleston

Creamy chickpea hummus makes an excellent dip for crisp garlic pita chips and assorted vegetables. Slice up some carrots sticks, sweet bell pepper strips, and fresh mushrooms for a complete and filling low calorie lunch.

Low Calorie Light Hummus

Garlic Pita Chips

3. Veggies Wrap with Strawberry Salad

Kimberley K. Eggleston

It will be easy to eat plenty of servings of fruits and vegetables with this low calorie lunch combo of a hearty veggie wrap and sweet strawberry salad. Is you are not up for preparing the salad, a simple whole piece of fruit would make an excellent partner for the wrap.

Veggie Wrap

Strawberry and Basil Salad

4. Turkey Club Sandwich and Yogurt Parfait

Kimberle K. Eggleston

This turkey club sandwich is absolutely amazing. If you are packing this low calorie lunch along, you may have the best results if you pack the ingredients for the sandwich is a container, seperate from the bread. Then, if you have access to a toaster at lunchtime, toast the bread right before you are ready to eat. If you don't have a toaster,?untoasted bread suits the sandwich just fine.

Low Calorie Turkey Club Sandwich

Fresh Berry and?Granola Parfait

5. Chicken Salad Pita with Homemade Potato Chips and Fresh Fruit

Baked Potato Chips RecipeKimberley K. Eggleston

You can't go wrong with this classic low calorie lunch of chicken salad in a whole wheat pita accompanied by crisp, homemade potato chips and fresh fruit. Keep the chicken salad in a storage dish until lunchtime, and then fill the pita with the salad. A small apple, orange, or fruit of you choice rounds out the meal.

Low Calorie Chicken Salad Pita

Homemade Potato Chips


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Roasted New Potatoes

Friday, November 4, 2011

A perfect accompaniment to roast chicken or tenderloin, these low fat roasted new potatoes can be cooked in the same oven as the meat, then the heat can be turned up to 450 degrees to crisp them once the meat is out of the oven and resting.

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Total Time: 45 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 pounds new potatoes, evenly sized
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • Kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp dried mixed herbs
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Preparation:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Combine oil and herbs in a bowl. Toss scrubbed new potatoes in the oil and place on a baking tray. Season with salt and pepper. Roast potatoes for 40-45 minutes until tender, turning occasionally.

If you are roasting the potatoes in the same oven as a roast chicken, place them in the oven 30 minutes before you expect the chicken to be done. Once the chicken is cooked and out of the oven, turn up the heat to 450 degrees so the potatoes can become crisp on the outside.

Serves 4.

Per Serving: Calories 168, Calories from Fat 32, Total Fat 3.6g (sat 0.6g), Cholesterol, 0, Sodium 10mg, Carbohydrate 30.6g, Fiber 2.7g, Protein 3.5g


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Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

Friday, November 4, 2011

What should you do with all those pumpkin seeds from your carved pumpkins? Why, roast them, of course. Usually people enjoy them as a savory snack, but in our house we like to sprinkle cinnamon and brown sugar over our pumpkin seeds.

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients:

  • Seeds from 1 pumpkin
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp brown sugar
  • Butter-flavored cooking spray

Preparation:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Rinse pumpkin seeds in a colander and dry with kitchen paper. Spread pumpkin seeds in one layer on a large cookie sheet lined with parchment paper or a silicone mat.

Sprinkle cinnamon and sugar over seeds. Spray briefly with cooking spray.

Roast for 20-25 minutes, until lightly browned, stirring halfway through.

Per quarter-cup serving of whole roasted pumpkin seeds: Calories 74, Calories from Fat 28, total Fat 3.1g (sat fat 0.6g), Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium 3mg, Carbohydrate 8.6g, Fiber 0.6g, Protein 3.8g


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How to Make Apple Tarts

Thursday, November 3, 2011

Apple Tarts

Give these simple apple tarts a try with fresh apples that are in season right now! I like to use granny smith apples, but if you can find jonagold or pippin apples, they work great in this recipe as well.

Photo@ Kimberley K. Eggleston, licensed to About.com, Inc


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Roasted Harvest Vegetables

Thursday, November 3, 2011

Roasted Fall Veggies

Fall veggies such as sweet potatoes and butternut squash are showing up in the supermarkets. I made this roasted harvest vegetable dish the other day by following just a few simple steps, and really enjoyed these wonderful fall vegetables.

Photo@ Kimberley K. Eggleston, licensed to About.com, Inc


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