Lightened Pizza

Friday, April 20, 2012

low calorie pizza

Sometimes the weekend just calls for ordering out. For us, that usually means calling up a pizza delivery store.? Are there ways to keeps the calorie count down when eating pizza? sure there are. I am just carefull about what types of crust and toppings I order on my pizza, savings several grams of fat, and thus several calories.

Photo@ Kimberley K. Eggleston, licensed to About.com, Inc


View the original article here

Read more ...

Low-Carb Passover

Friday, April 20, 2012
altYou'd think low carbers would have an edge at Passover. After all, we don't really go in for bread (leavened or not) at any time of the year, and we tend to make most of our dishes without flour. To a large extent, it's true that there are advantages to eating low carb at Passover. There are a couple of potential snags, and I try to help you get around them. I wish a joyful Low-Carb Passover to all who celebrate.

Photo: Mitch Hrdlicka/Getty Images

Related Resources:

Forum | Facebook | Twitter | Newsletter & RSS

View the original article here

Read more ...

Can I Bake with Truvia?

Thursday, April 19, 2012

Question: Can I Bake with Truvia?

I have heard about a calorie-free sweetener called Truvia. Can I use Truvia to bake with in my favorite recipes?

Answer:

Truvia is indeed a calorie-free sweetener, making it attractive for low calorie dieters. While it is simple to use as a calorie-free sweetener for sprinkling in beverages or on grapefruit, baking with Truvia can be a bit more tricky. Truvia cannot replace sugar cup for cup in baked goods. The manufacturer of Truvia says that you can replace some of the sugar with Truvia in baked products, but for best results it is best to leave at least 1/4 cup of real sugar in your recipe. Real sugar plays an important role other than providing sweetness when you bake with it. Keeping some regular sugar in the recipe will help with browning, spreading, and the structure of the finished baked good. After adding 1/4 cup of regular sugar to your recipe you can replace the remaining sugar with Truvia. You can refer to the manufacturer's conversion chart located on their website to figure out how much Truvia to add. The conversion works out to be about three and a half tablespoons of Truvia to replace every half cup of sugar. Keep in mind that Truvia is sold only in small packets, so you will be using several little packets to achieve the result you want.

Baking with Truvia also requires a cooler oven. According to the manufacturer of Truvia, you should reduce the baking temperature by about 25-50°F, and then increase the cooking time by 5-10 minutes.

Using Truvia can save you some calories in your baked goods, though you should not expect your dish to turn out exactly as it would if you were using actual sugar. And keep in mind that while Truvia is made from a natural ingredient derived from the stevia plant, it has not been approved by the FDA.


View the original article here

Read more ...

Carbs in Portabella Mushrooms

Thursday, April 19, 2012
Portabella mushrooms (especially the large ones) can be useful as vehicles for other ingredients such as pizza toppings. Grilled portabellas are very tasty and can be used instead of hamburger buns. They also take well to marinades. I prefer to remove the gills, as they can turn very dark and exude liquid which muddies the flavors of the other ingredients. Portabella mushrooms (sometimes mistakenly called portabello mushrooms) are grownup crimini mushrooms.

Carb Profile for White (Button) Mushrooms

Carbohydrate and Fiber Counts for Portabella Mushrooms

  • ? cup diced raw portabella mushrooms: 1.5 gram effective (net) carbohydrate plus .5 gram fiber and 11 calories
  • 1 large portabella cap (about 3 oz.): 3 grams effective (net) carbohydrate plus 1 gram fiber and 22 calories
  • ? cup sliced grilled portabella mushrooms: 1.5 gram effective (net) carbohydrate plus 1.5 fiber and and 21 calories

Glycemic Index for Portabella Mushrooms

As with most non-starchy vegetables, there is no scientific study of the glycemic index of mushrooms.

More Information about the Glycemic Index

Estimated Glycemic Load of Portabella Mushrooms

  • ? cup diced raw portabella mushroom: 1
  • 1 large portabella cap (about 3 oz.): 2
  • ? cup sliced grilled portabella mushrooms: 2

More Information About the Glycemic Load

Health Benefits of Portabella Mushrooms

Portabella mushrooms are an excellent source of copper, selenium, riboflavin, and niacin, and a very good source of panothenic acid, potassium, and phosphorus. They are a good source of thiamin.

Sources:

Leroux, Marcus, Foster-Powell, Kaye, Holt, Susanna and Brand-Miller, Janette. "International table of glycemic index and glycemic load values: 2002." American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Vol. 76, No. 1, 5-56, (2002).

USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.


View the original article here

Read more ...

Strawberry Yogurt Popsicles

Thursday, April 19, 2012

These strawberry yogurt popsicles are so easy to make. If you don't have popsicle molds, simply use 3-ounce paper cups. Once you've poured in the mixture, cover the top of the cup with foil wrap, and poke a popsicle stick into it. After freezing the popsicle, tear off the paper cup and enjoy your frozen strawberry treat.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pint fresh strawberries, hulled
  • 2 tbsp sugar dissolved in 2 tbsp warm water
  • 1 6 ounce pot fat-free plain or vanilla Greek yogurt (such as Oikos)

Preparation:

Place strawberries in a food processor or blender and pulse until not quite pureed. Stir in sugar and water. Stir in yogurt.

Pour into popsicle molds and freeze for 4-6 hours

Makes about 6 3-ounce popsicles

Per Popsicle: Calories 58, Calories from Fat 3, Total Fat 0.4g (sat 0g), Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium 23mg, Carbohydrate 11.7g, Protein 2.1g


View the original article here

Read more ...

10 Things to Stop Doing

Thursday, April 19, 2012
altWe've been doing a fun thing in the Health section of About.com (or at least what passes for a "fun thing" among health writers). We've written "10 Things to Stop Doing" lists. There's everything from "10 Things to Stop Doing if you Have Cancer" to "10 Things to Stop Doing in Yoga Class". I hope you'll check them out and find some useful advice!

Since these lists are going out to some people who aren't already eating low-carb, in mine I included some obvious ones ("Stop drinking sugary drinks"), but I hope there will be something in there for everyone in 10 Things to Stop Doing on a Low-Carb Diet.

Photo: Vincenzo Lombardo/Getty Images

Related Resources:

Forum | Facebook | Twitter | Newsletter & RSS

View the original article here

Read more ...

Spinach Omelette

Thursday, April 19, 2012

Here we will learn how to make a omelette that is low in calories. This recipe uses egg substitute instead of whole eggs to help trim calories, and is filled with nutrient-packed spinach for a healthy breakfast.

To begin, you will need to gather all ingredients together. For this recipe you will need:

  • 1/2 tsp canola oil
  • 2 Tbsp chopped onion
  • 1/2 tsp dried Italian seasoning
  • 1 cup egg substitute (such as Egg Beaters)
  • Dash of ground black pepper
  • ? cup torn spinach leaves
  • 2 Tbsp shredded, part-skim mozzarella cheese (1/2 oz.)

View the original article here

Read more ...

Low Fat Easter Recipes

Thursday, April 19, 2012
My younger daughter's birthday is sometimes just before Easter, and sometimes just after. Occasionally it coincides with Good Friday or Easter Sunday. She finds this confusing. I tried to explain that, unlike Christmas, which is always December 25th, the date of Easter Sunday varies from year to year--something to do with a Paschal full moon.

Anyway, Easter Sunday falls on April 8th this year. So here is a selection of low-fat Easter recipes so you can put together a family-friendly low-fat Easter brunch, lunch or dinner.

Herbed Roast Chicken Dinner c Fiona Haynes, licensed to About.com, Inc.


View the original article here

Read more ...

Homemade Chinese Take-out

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

low calorie egg rolls

Sweet and sour chicken and egg rolls, made at home? Yes, just a few simple steps makes making sweet and sour chicken easy at home. We like to serve it up with steamed brown rice, and baked egg rolls to round off the meal.

Photo@ Kimberley K. Eggleston, licensed to About.com, Inc


View the original article here

Read more ...

BBQ Beans

Wednesday, April 18, 2012
This recipe uses black soy beans for great taste with fewer carbs and more protein.

Ingredients:

  • 1 can black soy beans
  • 1 small onion, chopped fine
  • 1 cup low carb barbecue sauce (see link to recipe below)

Preparation:

This recipe uses my low carb barbecue sauce.

Saute onion in a little oil until soft. Add the beans and the sauce. Simmer 15-20 minutes.

Nutritional Information: Each serving has 9 grams effective carbohydrate plus 7 grams fiber, 11 grams protein, and 166 calories.


View the original article here

Read more ...

Cajun Shrimp Kebabs

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Use your favorite salt-free Cajun seasoning blend--mine has paprika, celery seed, garlic, basil, white pepper, cayenne pepper, thyme and parsley--to add a kick to these shrimp kebabs.

Prep Time: 20?minutes

Cook Time: 5?minutes

Total Time: 25?minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp Cajun seasoning (preferably salt-free)
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 1 pound medium shrimp, de-veined, tail on

Preparation:

Soak 4-6 wooden skewers in cold water for 30 minutes. Combine olive oil, lemon juice, Cajun seasoning and garlic in a small bowl. Place shrimp in a glass dish and drizzle with Cajun mixture, turning to coat. Cover and marinate for 15 minutes. Preheat grill or broiler, then thread shrimp on to pre-soaked skewers. Broil or grill for 2-3 minutes each side. Serve as an appetizer or as an entree with grilled vegetables and rice.

Per serving: Calories 154, Calories from Fat 49, Total Fat 5.5g (sat 0.9g), Cholesterol 170mg, Sodium 168mg, Carbohydrate 3g, Fiber 0.2g, Protein 23.2g


View the original article here

Read more ...

Easter Sugar Cookies

Wednesday, April 18, 2012
Assuming you don't go overboard with the jelly beans, chocolate bunnies and marshmallow chicks, you can allow yourself one of these cute little homemade Easter sugar cookies. With less butter (so less fat) than regular sugar cookies, you don't need to feel too guilty. The kids will have fun making them, decorating them, and, no doubt, eating them! Don't ruin them by using trans-fat-filled canned frosting; use colorful sprinkles, sugars and decorating gels instead.

Easter cookies c Fiona Haynes, licensed to About.com, Inc.


View the original article here

Read more ...

Paleo Eating Vs Low-Carb Eating

Wednesday, April 18, 2012
low Low-carb diets and and paleo-oriented diets are sometimes mentioned together, because there is a fair amount of overlap in the approaches. Paleo eaters base what they eat on a model of eating as our pre-agricultural ancestors did, since our physiology is essentially the same as theirs was. This means that paleo folks generally don't eat much in the way of grains, legumes, processed foods, and often dairy. So the paleo diet (think meats, eggs, vegetables, fruits, nuts) tends to be naturally low in carbohydrate, and it has been thought by many that part of the benefit of a paleo diet is due to this. In fact, the dramatic health improvements people report from shifting to a paleo way of eating are remarkably similar to the thousands of descriptions I've heard from people following a low-carb way of eating.

Recently, there seems to be somewhat of a backlash in some of the paleo community regarding its relationship to carbohydrates. There are a couple of aspects to this, including a) people adding so-called "safe starches"* (e.g. yams) to their diets with good results, and b) rejecting the idea that the benefits of a paleo diet is in any way related to the fact there is generally less carbohydrate. Most paleo folks subscribe to the idea that it is simply that they are eating "real whole foods", which includes not eating added sugars, refined carbohydrates, and artificial ingredients, but not necessarily less carbohydrate overall.

One prominent paleo blogger, Stephan Guyenet, has offered an explanation as to why both low-carb and paleo diets tend to result in weight loss: both diets eliminate what we could call "hyper-palatable foods" -- foods manufactured to be highly palatable and, it is argued, producing a reaction in our bodies that has some similarities to addiction, or at least "wanting to eat a whole lot". Dr. Guyenet engaged in a long public discussion with Gary Taubes about this issue.

More recently, Richard Nikoley, of the Free the Animal Blog did some experiments adding potato to his diet and finding positive results. This and other research led him to form a synthesis of his thinking to date on the subject which he posted in his blog. He includes in his musings thoughts about why people don't always get to their goal weight on a low-carb diet.

I think all this thinking and debating is as healthy as eating real whole food! So I thought I'd jump in with one or two observations, as it's a subject I'm getting asked about more and more.

I have a friend and neighbor who's family starting following a paleo way of eating a couple of years ago, with great results -- weight loss, normalized blood pressure, etc. She and I chat from time to time about paleo and low-carb eating. We've talked about the "safe starches" concept, and I've basically maintained that everyone has a different level of carb sensitivity. Recently, she told me, "well, I've come to the conclusion that there are no safe starches for me".

This is exactly it. Everyone has to find out about their own bodies. As I've recently written about, a growing segment of the population has problems with blood sugar, and the vast majority do not know it. Diabetes, insulin resistance, pre-diabetes, "pre-pre-diabetes", and reactive hypoglycemia probably affect at least half of the overall adult U.S. population, with the percentage rising with age. These are disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (actually the same disorder, just at different points along the spectrum), so regulation of carbohydrate consumption must be part of the solution. The young, vital, healthy people I saw at the Ancestral Health Symposium hopefully are eating in a way to avoid becoming part of that group. But for some of us, it's too late, and there is no alternative but to pay close attention to the amount of carbohydrate we're consuming if we want to preserve our health.

As for Nikoley's thoughts on the issue of why some don't get to their goal weight, I think we also have to factor in the many appetite control mechanisms in our bodies which are part of our bodies' attempts to keep us at a certain weight (or, probably more accurately, with a certain amount of fat). A couple of recent blogs I've written about this are here and here. Hunger actually does play a role in how much we weigh! It always surprises me how little attention this gets from people talking about weight loss! Of course, we can continue to decrease the amount of food we're eating, but few people are able to fight hunger on a constant basis. Why do people losing weight level off at different places? My speculation is that it has to do with how much permanent damage there is to the metabolic system and, in particular, the pancreas. We know that by the time a person is diagnosed with diabetes, roughly half the beta cells in their pancreas are damaged, and people with pre-diabetes have significant damage. The Endocrine Society cites evidence that damgage is present quite a while before a person would be labeled prediabetic. I suspect that this factors greatly into the probability of sustained weight loss.

In any case, I think it's natural to figure out what works for you and/or the people around you, and try to generalize beyond that -- that it's true for everyone, or nearly so. To the extent that people who are attracted to low-carb eating and to paleo eating are two different (though overlapping) populations, different things may appear to work, and our ideas get reinforced when the same thing works for people who are like us.

I think the important thing is that we all keep trying things out and sharing the results, so we can all learn from each other. So hurray for everyone following the best approach of all, the "My Body, My Science Experiment" approach!

*For anyone interested in what makes some starches "not safe" -- from a paleo perspective a lot of it is thought to be due to "anti-nutrients" in many grains, legumes, and other plant foods. For an excellent discussion of this issue, I highly recommend Loren Cordain's latest book, The Paleo Answer: 7 Days to Lose Weight, Feel Great, Stay Young.

Photo c Joe Cicak

Related Resources:

Forum | Facebook | Twitter | Newsletter & RSS

View the original article here

Read more ...

Have a Low-Carb Easter

Wednesday, April 18, 2012
easterWhat are your Easter food traditions? Glazed ham? Chocolate? Let's see if we can find some ways to cut back on carbs while enjoying the day. I've written up some suggestions for a low-carb Easter with links to recipes all over About.com's Food and Drink Channel to help you out.

Photo c Carol Kramberger

Related Resources:


View the original article here

Read more ...

How to Cook Quinoa

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

First you will want to determine how much quinoa you want to end up with. Quinoa increases 4 times in size when cooked. So, if you want to end up with 4 cups of cooked quinoa, you will measure out 1 cup of dry quinoa to be cooked. If you want 2 cups of cooked quinoa, measure out 1/2 cup of dry quinoa etc.

To cook quinoa, you use a 2:1 ratio, or you would use two cups of water for every 1 cup of dry quinoa.

*While there are other methods of cooking quinoa, for example in a rice cooker, this lesson will cover cooking quinoa on the stovetop.


View the original article here

Read more ...

10 Things to Stop Doing

Tuesday, April 17, 2012
Eating a healthy low-carb diet isn't always easy, especially at first. But you can definitely make it worse for yourself! Here are ten easy things you can stop doing to make it easier on yourself.

1. Stop Drinking Sugary Drinks

This one seems totally obvious, but this is the #1 source of sugar in the U.S. diet, by far. There may not be another thing besides quitting smoking that would have as great an effect on the health of the general population than to stop doing this.

Of course, water is the obvious thing to substitute, but this is going to sound a little austere to a lot of people. Another suggestion is tea, in all its many forms: hot, iced, black, green, and herbal. The "regular" teas (black or green) and many of the herbals have a lot of health benefits, at a fraction of the cost of soda. There are even flavored teas. And don't be afraid to mix and match! My current favorite is to brew some flavored green tea (lemon, mango, or jasmine) with some black tea. (Note: if you're brewing green tea, it should be at a slightly lower temperature than black to avoid bitterness. I throw a couple of ice cubes into the kettle after it comes to a boil.)

2. Stop Going Hungry

Does the word "diet" bring on memories of being hungry, obsessing about food, and even dreaming about food? Do you think hunger and deprivation are necessary for weight loss? Well, start thinking about the opposite! If these experiences are frequent, your way of eating is simply not sustainable. Check this out: Low-carbers talk about their favorite things about eating this way, and notice how often "lack of hunger" and "feeling satisfied" comes up. ("Just cut down on calories" might work for awhile, but it usually becomes the same thing as "just go hungry".)

3. Stop Being Afraid of Eating Fat

The messages about how bad it is to eat fats are everywhere. You simply must learn to ignore them. The Harvard School of Public Health held a symposium with food writers and journalists where they asked them to take a pledge to stop using the term "low-fat", but, alas, it was apparently in vain.

4. Stop Eating the Same Things Every Day

When we first change our diet, it's easy to get into a rut and eat the same few foods all the time. This, for most people gets boring pretty fast, and the label "boring" is quickly added to the diet. Look at some cookbooks or recipes online, check out the spice aisle for inspiration, try a new vegetable or cut of meat. Use the change in your diet as an opportunity to expand your horizons. And remember, variety is a good thing, nutritionally speaking.

5. Stop Relying on Low-Carb Junk Food

Low-carb bars and packets of snack foods have their place -- when traveling, for example. But there are drawbacks to making them a part of our everyday diet. For one thing, people tend to have highly variable blood sugar reactions to many of these products. The "net carbs" may be look low, but for a variety of reasons, your body may disagree. Also, these so-called "highly palatable foods" are designed to "hook" our taste buds and brains into wanting more. Eating lots of artificially-sweetened foods foods is an example, as they tend to make us keep believing that foods are supposed to be that highly-sweetened.

6. Stop Browsing the Cereal, Crackers, and Cookie Aisles

Out of sight, out of mind. Seriously. Gazing at those bag of Chips Ahoy! cookies only reminds you that you used to enjoy eating Chips Ahoy. No good can come of this. My husband says that there are "islands" in the supermarket with "food that won't poison me". He just goes to those islands. I, too, just go to the foods I'm looking for, and ignore the brightly-colored packages along the way. "Shopping the perimeter" of the store, and avoiding the inner aisles altogether, is a great strategy if you can manage it.

7. Stop Shorting Yourself on Sleep

There is a whole basket of things that stresses our bodies, and not getting enough sleep is one of the biggies. Lack of sleep and other kinds of stress tend to kick off cortisol and other stress hormones that mess with our blood sugar. This, of course, is the opposite of what a low-carb carb aims to do, which is to stabilize blood sugar. As part of the package, the stress reactions of the body tend to increase appetite, which we certainly don't need!

8. Stop Freaking Out About Diet Studies in the News

I am a science-minded person -- in fact, I came to low-carb eating because of the science. But many "science" articles in the news misrepresent the research, or the studies themselves are problematic in some way. Rest assured that over the years, as data accumulates, it points more and more to a reduced-carb diet being a very healthy way to eat for much of the population. In any case, the average result of 50,000 people isn't going to tell you much about what will work for you. No study costing millions of dollars is needed; just check it out for yourself!

9. Stop Trying to Follow the Diet that Works for your Neighbor

Almost every diet works for some people, and different amounts of carbohydrate work best for different people. One of the strengths of the Atkins Diet, for example, is that it is structured to help each person zero in on the types and amounts of carbohydrate that work best for their bodies.

Similarly, don't try to argue your neighbor out of the diet that works for her or him. Just tell what works for you and your body -- that's hard to argue with.

10. Stop Avoiding the Truth

If you know that a reduced-carb diet works for you -- if you're healthier and happier when you've rid yourself of the extra sugar and starches -- you owe it to yourself to figure out a way to make this work for you as a permanent way of eating. No one is perfect, and we all need help making this a "way of eating" rather than a "diet". There's lots of help on this site and elsewhere on the Web, including our Low Carb Discussion Forum. Your future self will thank you!!

View the original article here

Read more ...

Bad Breath Solutions

Tuesday, April 17, 2012
One the possible "side-effects" of following a low-carb diet (be it Atkins, South Beach, or any other low-carb diet plan) is "bad breath", sometimes accompanied by a bad taste in the mouth. This is distressing, of course, but don't think you're condemned to live with it!

What causes bad breath on a low-carb diet?

There are many causes of bad breath, but if the change in your breath happened suddenly after starting a low-carb diet there are two main causes: 1) bad breath due to acetone caused by ketosis, and 2) an excess of protein in the diet producing ammonia in the breath.

1. Bad Breath from Ketosis ("Keto-Breath")

One of the results of cutting carbohydrates in our bodies that is that we start to use more fat for energy. This process generates molecules called "ketones". One type of ketone, called acetone, tends to be excreted, both in the urine and the breath. The description of the smell varies, but it is often described as "fruity" or like the smell of apples which are "past their prime" (or even downright rotten).

The good news is that keto-breath usually doesn't last forever. Most people find it dies down after a few weeks, or at the most a few months. The reason is unclear, but it seems our bodies adapt in some way. Children on a ketogenic diet for epilepsy have been shown to have less acetone in their breath as time goes on, for example. In the meantime, there are things you can do to minimize the impact of "keto-breath":

  1. Drink more water: try 8 glasses per day to see if this helps, and then you can experiment from that point.
  2. Natural breath fresheners to try include mint, parsley or other greens, cloves, cinnamon, and fennel seeds.
  3. Some people swear by breath capsules, which are usually made from parsley oil (e.g. Mint Assure) for keto-breath. Others find they do not help.
  4. Sugar-free mints or gum can be tried, but watch the carbs in them.

2. "Ammonia Breath" from Protein

When the body metabolizes protein, ammonia is produced. When people eat high-protein meals, there tends to be increased ammonia in their breath and/or urine. In large amounts, this can smell pretty bad.

It's important to remember that we don't need lots and lots of protein in our diets. Our bodies use protein to maintain and build muscles, to make enzymes, and for other structural and chemical needs. The body will convert excess protein to energy, which is where you will get the extra ammonia (this also happens during starvation or long exercise when the body begins to rely on breaking down muscles for energy if it runs out of sources of fats and/or carbohydrates).

Find Out How Much Protein Your Body Needs

Sometimes people load up on protein because they are afraid to eat more fat. This is one of the reasons why it is rarely a good idea to try to eat a diet that is low in both carbohydrates and fats. The solution to "ammonia breath" for people on a low-carb diet is often to increase fats in the diet, and cut back some on protein foods.

Above all, don't let problems with your breath derail you from staying with a diet that is improving your health. Instead, try to figure out the cause of the bad-smelling breath and tackle it.

Sources:

Musa-Veloso K, Rarama E, et al "Epilepsy and the ketogenic diet: assessment of ketosis in children using breath acetone." Pediatric Research 52(3):(2002)

Musa-Veloso K, Likhodii, S, et al. "Breath acetone is a reliable indicator of ketosis in adults consuming ketogenic meals." American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 76(1): (2002)

Smith David, et al. "Trace gases in breath of healthy volunteers when fasting and after a protein-calorie meal: a preliminary study." Journal of Applied Physiology, 87(5):(1999)


View the original article here

Read more ...

In Search of the Perfect Human Diet

Tuesday, April 17, 2012
perfectI just saw a great new documentary called "In Search of the Perfect Human Diet". The producer, director, and narrator, C.J. Hunt almost died at age 24 from a heart condition and spent the next period of his life searching for health and knowledge about what he should eat. The journey took him around the world and he's put it all together into a great film, available on DVD. One thought from the film can be our Thought for the Day: "We don't have to wait for the government or the media. We can start with our next meal." The road to good health is truly only one meal away! Check out my review of the DVD for my thoughts and more information, including where to get it.

Photo Courtesy of Hunt Thompson Media

Related Resources:

Forum | Facebook | Twitter | Newsletter & RSS

View the original article here

Read more ...

Mushroom Risotto

Tuesday, April 17, 2012
One good way to eat less fat during the course of a week is to switch out one or two meat-based dishes for vegetable-based ones. One such dish could be risotto, so long as you're not too heavy handed with cheese or you dispense with cheese altogether. Contrary to popular belief, risotto is straightforward enough to make, it just needs a little time and attention, something that we're short of in the course of a busy week. Even so, risotto can be on the table in about 30 minutes or so. One of my family's favorite risotto meals is a simple mushroom risotto. Although I specify cremini and shiitake mushrooms in the recipe, feel free to use button mushrooms if that's what you happen to have on hand.

Mushroom Risotto c Fiona Haynes, licensed to About.com


View the original article here

Read more ...

Yet More Low-Carb Videos

Tuesday, April 3, 2012
burgerI'm on the home stretch of organizing all the videos About.com has added to my site recently. This time, it's videos specific to a certain popular diet: Atkins, South Beach, or Sugar Busters. Lots of info and tips about each of the diets on these pages:
Image c About.com

Forum | Facebook | Twitter | Newsletter & RSS


View the original article here

Read more ...

The End of Pink Slime?

Tuesday, April 3, 2012
Are the days of pink slime numbered? Beef Products, Inc. is suspending operations at three of its four plants where lean, finely textured beef--or pink slime--is produced. Famously derided by Celebrity Chef Jamie Oliver last year, we learned that pink slime is a filler made from mechanically separated beef, which includes the last otherwise inaccessible shreds of meat together with connective tissue, cartilage and other undesirable parts of a stripped carcass, and treated with ammonium hydroxide gas.

Food labels were not required to declare it, even though it was present in up to 70 percent of ground beef; and parents were horrified to learn that U.S. Department of Agriculture had purchased seven million tons of it to be used in school lunches. An online petition was mounted to remove pink slime from school lunches, gathering more than 250,000 signatures. In response, the USDA said that school districts could choose between beef with the filler or without.

Fast food restaurants and many big-name grocery stores such as Safeway and Kroger declared they would no longer sell beef containing pink slime. Meanwhile the American Meat Institute maintained that the product was "absolutely edible," and that the process of mechanically separating beef was similar to that of separating cream from milk.

Consumers, it seems, were not reassured.

Ground Beef Packages Photo by Rob Melnychuk/Getty Images

View the original article here

Read more ...

Dinner in a Flash

Tuesday, April 3, 2012
On most weekday evenings, we want to get dinner on the table as fast as possible. All too often that means sacrificing nutrition for convenience. But the likelihood is, you can put together perfectly healthy meals with store-cupboard ingredients and have dinner ready in less than 30 minutes. Here are some great examples of quick and easy low fat meals.Tuna, Bean and Couscous Salad Photo c Fiona Haynes, licensed to About.com

View the original article here

Read more ...

Quinoa Stuffed Peppers

Monday, April 2, 2012

This dish is fantastic as-is, but can easily be made vegetarian by completely omitting the ground beef. This really is a dish all in itself, so does not really need any accompaniments.

Prep Time: 10?minutes

Cook Time: 40?minutes

Total Time: 50?minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 large green bell peppers
  • 1/2 pound ground sirloin
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped carrot
  • 1 clove garlic, finely minced
  • 1 cup cooked quinoa
  • cooked quinoa
  • 1 14 oz. can diced tomatoes
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp ground black pepper
  • 2 Tbsp finely chopped fresh basil
  • fresh basil
  • 1/2 cup grated fresh parmesan cheese

Preparation:

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2. Slice the green bell peppers in half vertically, and remove the pulp and seeds from the inside. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil, and add the bell peppers. Boil for 5 minutes, then remove the peppers from the water, and set aside.

3. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat, and add the hamburger. Break up the hamburger with a fork, and cook until the hamburger is no longer pink. Remove the hamburger, and set aside. Add the onion, carrot, and garlic to the pan, and cook 4-5 minutes, until vegetables are tender. Return the hamburger to the pan, and add the cooked quinoa, tomatoes, salt, and pepper. Continue cooking for 3-4 minutes, until heated through. Remove from the heat, and add the fresh basil.

4. Place the green pepper halves on a baking dish, and fill each cavity with about 3/4 cup of the quinoa mixture. Bake for 15 minutes.

5. Set the oven to the broil setting. Sprinkle the parmesan cheese evenly over the stuffed peppers, and broil for 2 minutes, until lightly browned.

Serves 4

Per Serving Calories 213


View the original article here

Read more ...

Shrimp and Angel Hair Pasta

Monday, April 2, 2012

Succulent lemon-marinated shrimp tossed with peas, roasted peppers and angel hair pasta make for a quick supper on a busy night. Enjoy with a green salad drizzled with your favorite low fat or fat free dressing.

Prep Time: 10?minutes

Cook Time: 10?minutes

Total Time: 20?minutes

Ingredients:

  • Juice of one lemon, divided
  • Lemon zest
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 20 medium shrimp, tail on
  • 1/2 jar roasted red peppers
  • 8-ounces angel hair pasta
  • 1 cup peas
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Preparation:

Combine lemon zest, and half the lemon juice in a dish. Add shrimp and marinate for 10 minutes. Chop red peppers and put to one side.

Place a large pot of water on to boil for the pasta.

Place angel hair pasta in pot, followed by peas. Cook pasta according to package instructions.

Preheat broiler, and spray broiler pan or baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray.

Arrange marinated shrimp on broiler pan, and broil 3 minutes first side, and two minutes the other. Do not overcook. Remove from heat.

Quickly drain pasta and peas, and empty into a large serving bowl. Add shrimp and chopped peppers; pour remaining lemon juice over the shrimp and pasta, and toss. Use freshly ground black pepper if desired. Serve immediately.

Serves 4.

Per Serving: Calories 274, Calories from Fat 16, Total Fat 1.7g (sat 0.1g), Cholesterol 45mg, Sodium 148mg, Carbohydrate 49.4g, Fiber 4g, Protein 15.1g


View the original article here

Read more ...

Spring Clean Your Diet

Monday, April 2, 2012
springSpring is a great time to clean out, dust off, and rake away the debris that collects over the winter. It's also a good time to look at what we're doing for our health. Have we let some of our resolutions lose some of their resolve? Have we let some "trigger foods" into the house to sabotage our way of eating? Let's clean out the pantry, tune-up, and renew, starting today! Here's some help:Photo c Chris Leschinsky/Getty Images

View the original article here

Read more ...

All About Asparagus

Monday, April 2, 2012
Described by King Louis XIV of France as "the food of kings," asparagus is still regarded as a prince among vegetables. Asparagus is a harbinger of spring, and its arrival is eagerly awaited by many; myself included. There are so many ways to enjoy asparagus: simply roasted with a squeeze of lemon and some freshly ground black pepper, or as an ingredient in risottos, stir fries, and many other delicious dishes. While asparagus, like so many other vegetables, is technically available year round, now is the time to enjoy it at its best. Find out how to choose, store, prepare and best of all, eat asparagus, without resorting to drowning it in butter or smothering it in high-fat sauces.

Roasted Asparagus c 2012 Fiona Haynes, licensed to About.com


View the original article here

Read more ...

Low-Carb Stuffing Bread

Monday, April 2, 2012
This is a gluten-free bread I make to use as an ingredient in low-carb stuffing for turkey or chicken. It can also be a stovetop type of thing, but is better if it at least bakes for a little while. I also use it as a casserole topping, if I have some leftover.

Prep Time: 5?minutes

Cook Time: 30?minutes

Total Time: 35?minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 cups almond meal
  • 1/3 cup powdered egg whites (these are optional, but create a dryer bread which is less likely to get soggy. If you don't use the powdered, add an extra egg and use 1/3 cup water instead of 1/2 cup)
  • 1 Tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 Tablespoon poultry seasoning, such as Bell's Seasoning
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) melted butter
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup water
  • sugar substitute equal to 2-3 teaspoons sugar

Preparation:

Heat oven to 350 F.

Butter the bottom of a large loaf pan - if desired, line the bottom with parchment paper and butter or oil that as well.

1) Mix dry ingredient together (a whisk works well).

2) Add wet ingredients and mix well.

3) Pour into loaf pan.

Bake for 35 to 45 minutes until top is lightly browned (if you insert a toothpick into the loaf and it comes out clean, you can remove it from the oven.)

When cool enough to handle, remove from pan and break into large chunks. Let cool. At this point, I like to leave it out to dry for a few hours, or put it in a low oven. You can cut it into cubes first, if you'd like, or after it dries out a bit.

Use for low carb stuffing.


View the original article here

Read more ...

Easter Dinner Menu

Monday, April 2, 2012

For many, the center of the Easter celebration is the food! So, how do you enjoy Easter dinner while sticking to your low calorie budget? It may not be as difficult as you think, as long as you are armed with flavorful, easy-to-prepare recipes.

1. Main Dish Items

A popular item which adorns the center of the Easter dinner table is a ham. Do not think that just because you are watching your waistline, you cannot still enjoy an Easter ham! But, do be selective about your choice. Choose extra-lean, weighing in at just over 100 calories and 4 grams of fat per 3-ounce serving. Or, try a less traditional main course such as:

2. Easter Side Dish Items

The side dish selection may not be as tricky as you would suspect. Perhaps you should stay away from the deviled eggs (unless they are made with fat-free mayonnaise and mustard), and instead focus on fresh, colorful vegetables to brighten your meal. Choose among:

3. Easter Dessert Items

Of course, you cannot forget dessert. For an ultra low calorie dessert, take advantage of fresh spring strawberries with low calorie whipped topping, or other fresh fruit selections. If you prefer a more traditional dessert, try:

View the original article here

Read more ...

Vegetable Polenta Casserole

Sunday, April 1, 2012

This low-fat vegetable polenta casserole is quick and easy to prepare. For some variation, you can buy tubes of pre-cooked polenta with different flavorings, such as sun-dried tomato or mushroom and onion. You can find polenta in the same aisle as pasta and rice, and sometimes in the gluten-free section of the grocery store.

Cook Time: 45?minutes

Total Time: 45?minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 tsp olive oil
  • 1 cup finely chopped onion
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 8 ounce pack sliced cremini mushrooms
  • 1 cup chopped red pepper
  • 1 cup cubed zucchini
  • 1 26 ounce jar low fat, low sodium marinara sauce (such as Amy's)
  • 1 cup small broccoli florets
  • 1 18 ounce tube polenta, sliced into 18 slices
  • 3/4 cup shredded reduced-fat cheese of your choice

Preparation:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Heat 2 tsp oil in a large skillet.

Add onions and garlic and saute for 3-4 minutes. Add mushrooms, pepper and zucchini and cook until mushrooms are softened. Stir in broccoli and cook for 2 more minutes.

Add marinara sauce and simmer for 10 minutes.

Spoon about a half cup of the sauce into the bottom of an 8-inch square baking dish. Then add a layer of nine polenta slices. Cover polenta slices with half the vegetable mixture. Top with remaining nine polenta slices and add rest of vegetables.

Sprinkle with reduced-fat cheese. Cover and bake for 20 minutes.

Uncover and bake for 10 more minutes.

Serves 6

Per Serving: Calories 189, Calories from Fat 50, Total Fat 5.8g (sat 2g), Cholesterol 10mg, Sodium 465mg, Carbohydrate 26.7g, Fiber 4g, Protein 8g


View the original article here

Read more ...

Light Asparagus Strata

Sunday, April 1, 2012
The combination of cheese, eggs, and milk (or half and half) makes traditional stratas high in fat and calories. But this light asparagus strata contains a blend of eggs and liquid egg substitute, uses nonfat milk, and reduced fat cheese. It also uses whole wheat bread for an extra nutritional boost. Perfect for Easter morning or any spring family brunch, this strata can be prepared the night before and refirgerated, so all you have to do is pop it in the oven in the morning.

Light Asparagus Frittata Photo c Fiona Haynes, licensed to About.com


View the original article here

Read more ...

Spring is Salmon Season

Sunday, April 1, 2012
low-carbGood news in the Pacific - after a few years of severe limitations on salmon fishing due to falling numbers, the salmon are truly making a comeback. It seems we are learning from the carefully managed Alaskan fisheries. This is great, because wild salmon is simply one of the best things we can eat, both in terms of flavor and because it's so good for us! Salmon is a true super food, with healthy fats, Vitamin D, protein, and other healthy nutrients. Are you a salmon lover? I have lots of great info for you:
Photo c Karen Struthers

View the original article here

Read more ...

Lemon Flounder

Sunday, April 1, 2012

Fresh flounder fillets baked with lemon and a little white wine or vermouth make a wonderful low fat supper dish. Serve with asparagus or green beans.

Cook Time: 15?minutes

Total Time: 15?minutes

Ingredients:

  • 3 tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine or vermouth
  • 1 1/2 tsp lemon pepper
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 4 6-ounce flounder fillets

Preparation:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Combine lemon juice, white wine, lemon pepper and garlic in a small bowl.

Place flounder in one layer in a shallow glass baking dish. Spread lemon mixture evenly over the fish and bake for 15 minutes, or until fish flakes easily with a fork.

Serves 4.

Per Serving: Calories 151, Calories from Fat 18, Total Fat 2g (sat 0.5g), Cholesterol 84mg, Sodium 139mg, Carbohydrate 1.2g, Fiber 0g, Protein 32g


View the original article here

Read more ...

Chicken Tonight

Sunday, April 1, 2012

Pot Pie

Chicken may just be America's favorite meal. Here's a few of my favorite ways to prepare it!

Photo@ Kimberley K. Eggleston, licensed to About.com, Inc


View the original article here

Read more ...